Insider’s Guide: How to Pay for Therapeutic Boarding School (2017 UPDATE)

Before we dive into understanding the options for paying for a Therapeutic Boarding School, let’s quickly review what they are.

The Rise of Therapeutic Boarding Schools

Image result for boarding schoolAs public schools across the country have slowly been pruned back by state legislatures, funding for behavioral, emotional and academic support within schools have nearly dried up while public money is increasingly being used for private charter schools. Therefore, it’s not surprising private institutions that offer therapeutic (or quasi-therapeutic) environments like boarding schools and private schools have exploded. One of the fastest growing kinds of boarding schools is what’s called a Therapeutic Boarding School. Therapeutic boarding schools maintain the advantages of traditional boarding schools such as intimate class sizes, individual attention, great academics, developing student self-reliance, and the fun of living with peers in a completely “child-friendly” environment.

Some therapeutic boarding schools specialize in helping teens overcome certain psychological problems such as Attention Deficit Disorder, Bipolar, Asperger’s and even Depression. Others have programs for overcoming substance abuse problems or achieving weight loss. Some specialize in helping students who lack motivation get a fresh start in a nurturing environment. Most have some sort of family or parent involvement piece to ensure a team approach (ie. Weekly family therapy via phone or Skype).

While this all may sound great, there are definitely some risks and downsides (beyond the financial cost) of sending a kiddo off to therapeutic boarding school. I address those issues in great detail in another blog post. For now, let’s revisit the financial aspects…

Expense or Investment?

Parents often find themselves in a desperate situation with a troubled teenager. Their daughter runs away from home again, gets caught with the dealer down the street, crashes another car, and has yet another arrest. Parents become afraid for their teen’s lives as their teen’s risk-taking and lifestyle keeps becoming more extreme as the parents’ ability to set boundaries and expectations seemingly erodes.

It’s hard to think clearly and find solutions at times like this. Therapeutic boarding schools and therapeutic wilderness programs can provide answers, but they come at a price, with some programs running upwards of $50,000 a year.

But cost doesn’t have to be an insurmountable obstacle in getting your teen the help they need. We have helped countless parents in similar situations come up with creative ways to finance therapeutic boarding school, knowing that their child desperately needs an intervention. Therapeutic boarding schools are no longer exclusively the domain of the wealthy.

Top 10 Ways to Pay for Therapeutic Boarding School

Image result for therapeutic boarding school

Here are 10 ways families just like yours found to finance their teen’s therapeutic program:

1.   Hire a Consultant: Say what? More money? Yes, but trust me, this really will have super high ROI. Also referred to as case managers, therapeutic placement consultants or educational consultants, a good one is worth their weight in gold (a bad one is expensive and makes bad treatment recommendations). Make sure they are UNAFFILIATED with any program and have the clinical expertise to help advise and guide your family through the whole process. Some clinical educational consultants that specialize are able to handle this. A great case manager will be able to create a treatment plan, explain the process for getting a comprehensive psychological evaluation, walk with you through the intake process, support you while your teen is in the therapeutic boarding school, and coordinate discharge planning to ensure a seamless transition back to home or college. The last piece is essential – making sure your teen has everything they need to succeed after they return. Great case managers also know how to secure reimbursement from insurance providers for teens that attend therapeutic boarding schools. There are definitely some tricks (eg. Hire a case manager that’s also a licensed professional counselor and much of their work could be paid for by insurance) and inside knowledge necessary to make this happen.

Typical cost: $95 – 350/hr (some charge a flat fee of several thousand). 

2. Find the Program’s Financial Aid Officer: The private school or wilderness program should have a financial aid officer who can advise you about how to finance your child’s education. You should ask this person what programs, loans, discounts, or financial aid the school offers. Find out exactly what is included in the tuition and board bills, and if there are additional expenses such as buying uniforms or paying special fees for sports.

Typical Cost: Nothing – programs provide this to try to entice you into signing up. Beware of anything that sounds too good to be true – verify any claims they make about coverage from insurance, student grants/scholarships or loans. 

3.  Public School Funding: You may qualify for a loan through a kindergarten through 12th grade educational loan program. These loans work the same way as college loans, in that you pay what you can while your child is enrolled in the private school, and pay the rest off later. The terms of some loans let you spread out payments over 10 or 20 years. Your credit history will be a factor in securing a loan. Your school’s financial aid officer should be able to help you find such a loan.

Typical Cost: Your sanity – they will drive you crazy with the bureaucracy and take loads of time during your work day since everything in public school shuts down by 3:30pm. 

4.  Discounts for Upfront Payment: Some schools offer discounts if you pay by the year, instead of by the month. The average student stays at a therapeutic boarding school for less than two years, and wilderness programs are even shorter. A good therapeutic placement consultant/educational consultant will save you thousands of dollars by negotiating these discounts.

Typical Cost: More money upfront but no other associated costs. 

5. Tap 529: Consider using your child’s college fund first. Think of the therapeutic program as a way to get your child back on the right path toward college. Without intervention, she won’t have the grades or motivation to get through college and use her fund.

Typical Cost: Make sure there are no withdrawal penalties for use for therapeutic boarding school. 

6. Put it On Plastic: When you enroll your child in these therapeutic programs, there will be upfront expenses such as processing fees and deposits. Some parents borrow these initial payments from credit cards, especially ones that offer “frequent flier” miles. This way their child is immediately enrolled. They use their free mileage for transportation to and from the school.

Typical Cost: Beware of high interest rates if you don’t pay off your balance in full. 

7. Angel Investing: Some parents borrow the necessary funds from employers or relatives, and pay them back after securing educational loans or home equity loans.

Typical Cost: If you go through a peer-to-peer or crowdfunding site like The Lending Club or Kickstarter, count on a 5% fee for total amount funded. 

8. Health Insurance Reimbursement: Your health insurance policy may cover part of the cost of a therapeutic program as a medical expense. When you hire a case manager, they will be able to tell you how to file the paperwork and what you need from the program to ensure a speedy reimbursement.

Typical Cost: Sanity… totally lost if your insurer are jerks that don’t reimburse when and how they should. You are attempting to pull money from their cold, dead hands. Expect a fight.

9. Consult Your CPA: Some expenses for therapeutic schools and wilderness programs can be deducted from your income tax return as medical expenses. If you own your own business, you likely have WAY more creative options for deducting medical expenses.

Typical Cost: $200/hr for a good CPA to walk you through if and how to deduct from taxes.

10. Tap Home Equity: Parents have taken out second mortgages or home equity loans and then deducted their interest payments on their income tax returns.

Typical Cost: Fees, closing costs total 2-6%. It also bumps the timeframe for paying off that home back several years.

11. Public School Funding: We lied – there turns out to be 11 ways to pay for therapeutic boarding school. Is your child enrolled in public special education classes because of problems like attention deficit disorder and learning disabilities? Does your child have an “Individual Education Plan” at a public school? Do you suspect your child has learning problems that the public school cannot address? In certain cases, public school districts have to reimburse parents for private school tuitions. The Supreme Court ruled on June 22, 2009, that an Oregon school district had to reimburse a family for private school costs because the child in question could not achieve a free and appropriate education within the district. The child had not been enrolled in special education classes but was diagnosed later with attention deficit disorder.

When it comes to what matters most parents are unstoppable in finding ways to get the services and support they need. Don’t let cost be the determining factor. If your teen needs help, speak with a case manager, your trusted CPA as well as a therapeutic boarding school you’re considering and work together to find a way to get your teen back on track.

Program Review: Veritas Collaborative

In April 2014, Dr. Marino and I visited Veritas Collaborative in Durham, NC, a 2 year old for profit eating disorder treatment program specializing in children and adolescents. Don’t let the age of this program fool you – they clearly know what they’re doing and have some clinical and business heavy-weights in their corner.VC dining pic

 

Below is a write-up of our experiences, thoughts and additional info we gathered together just for you. As always, our perspective as clinicians may be uniquely different from those of perspective clients or their parents. We highly encourage you to do your own research before committing to any program.  

What They Do

Veritas provides Inpatient, Residential Treatment and Partial Hospitalization for adolescents and children with eating disorders. What is key in our description is what is not listed. This means, during a time when other programs do everything for anyone, Veritas has committed to specializing. They have 26 inpatient/acute residential beds and 12 partial hospitalization beds. Below is a description of the three different levels of care (directly from the Veritas Collaborative site).

Inpatient hospitalization is the most intensive level of treatment available. Inpatient treatment is necessary for those who need frequent nursing care or are medically unstable (as determined by vital signs, lab abnormalities, or general physical and psychological condition). Patients who are severely entrenched in their disorders are depressed, suicidal, or are a danger to themselves or others, are also appropriate for this level of care. These patients see a medical doctor daily.

Acute Residential Treatment is a 24-hour monitored, structured treatment program for medically stable patients who still need constant supervision. Nursing care is still provided around the clock, but patients see doctors less frequently. Some individuals are admitted directly to residential treatment while others first go through inpatient treatment and them move to the residential program.VC bdrm pic

The Partial Hospitalization level of care is appropriate for patients who need structured programming but do not need 24-hour supervision. Patients participate in individual and group therapy, structured activities, and programming around meals similar to what is offered in the inpatient and residential programs. Some patients admit directly to this level of care, but many “step down” from the residential or inpatient levels, as partial programming still provides a high amount of structure and support. These patients are medically stable, and can move more readily while maintaining appropriate, non-disordered behaviors without direct supervision.

Another key feature to the Veritas program is the pervasive use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), both of which are evidence-based treatments for eating disorders and co-occurring mental health issues.

Who They Serve

Veritas serves children and adolescents (both male/female) 10-19 years old from around the country experiencing eating disorders. It’s rare for an eating disorder program to serve younger adolescents and children which is a huge plus. It’s also less common for a program to work with male clients. VC pic

Location

Veritas is located at 615 Douglas St #500, Durham, NC 27705. They sit right next to Duke University. They are 20 minutes from the Raleigh-Durham International Airport (super, super easy airport to travel through) and 2 hours from the Charlotte airport. The parking deck is easily accessed from the road. The building is nondescript but that’s works nicely for those seeking a more discrete treatment experience. 

Fees + Insurance + Financing 

Yes, they accept insurance and will work with you to figure out what is covered.

As with most treatment centers, there are many outside financing agencies that specifically work with mental, behavioral and substance abuse programs.

A quick word about their fees – they wouldn’t say. Not a peep about daily or monthly rates which, in our humble opinion is no bueno. See below in the Reviews section for commentary on this. It’s not unusual for programs to defer questions about cost but they eventually give us an idea (normally as a monthly rate). But not Veritas. 

Reviews

It’s really disappointing and feels a bit awkward when we have a hard time finding negative reviews of a program. Either they’ve done a good job of scrubbing the internet of nasty feedback or…. they actually provide great service. From all around the intertubes we scoured parent blogs, professional review sites as well as the more general review sites. So what’s out there? What’s the overall judgement of this fledgling treatment center? Mostly just really nice praise for the staff, treatment and program as a whole. The thing that kept on coming up over and over was Veritas’s involvement of the whole family – which happens to be another key feature they told us about on our tour. Family work is at the core of how they impact the client’s treatment. 

One negative in our view is discussion of cost. We really, really like programs to be up front about what the estimated costs for service will be. It’s not that we expect a solid dollar amount since we know as well as the next professional that expenses can go up or down depending on loads of variables. But what we do want to see is an effort towards transparency, especially with pricing. When asked for pricing we were told ‘it depends‘ but would not commit to a daily or monthly rate and nothing is listed on their site. 

Other than the cost issue we experienced, there’s not much else for us to complain about. We’ll definitely continue looking for bad reviews and update this post. 

Contact Information

Reach out to Kelly Robinson at krobinson@veritascollaborative.com or 919.698.8574 to learn more or take a tour. You can also schedule a tour directly from their site here: Schedule a Tour.

Final Thoughts

Overall, we encourage perspective clients to take a tour and consider the program. It’s best to higher an educational consultant or case manager to go with you. They will ask detailed questions you may not think to ask or just feel way too uncomfortable to ask. This is a decision you should not make alone. 

The Maudsley Method for Eating Disorder Treatment

imagesThe Maudsley Approach (aka Maudsley Family Therapy) is a family therapy specifically designed for the treatment of anorexia nervosa (but now used for many other eating disorders) devised by Christopher Dare and colleagues at the Maudsley Hospital in London.

The Maudsley approach can mostly be construed as an intensive outpatient treatment where parents play an active and positive role in order to: Help restore their child’s weight to normal levels expected given their adolescent’s age and height; hand the control over eating back to the adolescent, and; encourage normal adolescent development through an in-depth discussion of these crucial developmental issues as they pertain to their child.

More ‘traditional’ treatment of AN suggests that the clinician’s efforts should be individually based. Strict adherents to the perspective ofonly individual treatment will insist that the participation of parents, whatever the format, is at best unnecessary, but worse still interference in the recovery process. In fact, many proponents of this approach would consider ‘family problems’ as part of the etiology of the AN. No doubt, this view might contribute to parents feeling themselves to blame for their child’s illness. The Maudsley Approach opposes the notion that families are pathological or should be blamed for the development of AN. On the contrary, the Maudsley Approach considers the parents as a resource and essential in successful treatment for AN.

Phase I: Weight Restoration

The Maudsley Approach proceeds through three clearly defined phases, and is usually conducted within 15-20 treatment sessions over a period of about 12 months. In Phase I, also referred to as the weight restoration phase, the therapist focuses on the dangers of severe malnutrition associated with AN, such as hypothermia, growth hormone changes, cardiac dysfunction, and cognitive and emotional changes to name but a few, assessing the family’s typical interaction pattern and eating habits, and assisting parents in re-feeding their daughter or son. The therapist will make every effort to help the parents in their joint attempt to restore their adolescent’s weight. At the same time, the therapist will endeavor to align the patient with her/his siblings. A family meal is typically conducted during this phase, which serves at least two functions:

It allows the therapist to observe the family’s typical interaction patterns around eating, and it provides the therapist with an opportunity to assist the parents in their endeavor to encourage their adolescent to eat a little more than she was prepared to.

The way in which the parents go about this difficult but delicate task does not differ much in terms of the key principles and steps that a competent inpatient nursing team would follow. That is, an expression of sympathy and understanding by the parents with their adolescent’s predicament of being ambivalent about this debilitating eating disorder, while at the same time being verbally persistent in their expectation that starvation is not an option. Most of this first phase of treatment is taken up by coaching the parents toward success in the weight restoration of their offspring, expressing support and empathy toward the adolescent given her dire predicament of entanglement with the illness, and realigning her with her siblings and peers. Realignment with one’s siblings or peers means helping the adolescent to form stronger and more age appropriate relationships as opposed to being ‘taken up’ into a parental relationship.

Throughout, the role of the therapist is to model to the parents an uncritical stance toward the adolescent – the Maudsley Approach adheres to the tenet that the adolescent is not to blame for the challenging eating disorder behaviors, but rather that these symptoms are mostly outside of the adolescent’s control (externalizing the illness). At no point should this phase of treatment be interpreted as a ‘green light’ for parents to be critical of their child. Quite the contrary, the therapist will work hard to address any parental criticism or hostility toward the adolescent.

Phase II: Returning Control over Eating to the Teen

The patient’s acceptance of parental demand for increased food intake, steady weight gain, as well as a change in the mood of the family (i.e., relief at having taken charge of the eating disorder), all signal the start of Phase II of treatment.

This phase of treatment focuses on encouraging the parents to help their child to take more control over eating once again. The therapist advises the parents to accept that the main task here is the return of their child to physical health, and that this now happens mostly in a way that is in keeping with their child’s age and their parenting style. Although symptoms remain central in the discussions between the therapist and the family, weight gain with minimum tension is encouraged. In addition, all other general family relationship issues or difficulties in terms of day-to-day adolescent or parenting concerns that the family has had to postpone can now be brought forward for review. This, however, occurs only in relationship to the effect these issues have on the parents in their task of assuring steady weight gain. For example, the patient may want to go out with her friends to have dinner and a movie. However, while the parents are still unsure whether their child would eat entirely on her own accord, she might be required to have dinner with her parents and then be allowed to join friends for a movie.

Phase III: Establishing Healthy Teen Identity

Phase III is initiated when the adolescent is able to maintain weight above 95% of ideal weight on her/his own and self-starvation has abated.

Treatment focus starts to shift to the impact AN has had on the individual establishing a healthy adolescent identity. This entails a review of central issues of adolescence and includes supporting increased personal autonomy for the adolescent, the development of appropriate parental boundaries, as well as the need for the parents to reorganize their life together after their children’s prospective departure.

Maudsley Approach Sites

In addition to the Maudsley Hospital and other centers in London, this family-based approach to treatment is implemented by programs in the United States, including Columbia University and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, Duke University, Durham, NC, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, the University of California at San Diego, CA and the Eating and Weight Disorders Center of Seattle (part of the Evidence Based Treatment Centers of Seattle), Seattle, WA. Dissemination of the Maudsley Approach has also been successful in Canada, e.g., Eastern Ontario Children’s Hospital in Ottawa, North York General Hospital and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and McMaster University in Hamilton, ON. The adolescent eating disorders program at the Westmead Children’s Hospital in Sydney, and the eating disorders program at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, have well established FBT programs. 

Conclusion

In summary, the Maudsley Approach holds great promise for most teens who have been ill for less than 3 years. This family-based treatment can prevent hospitalization and assist the adolescent in her/his recovery, provided that parents are seen as a resource and that they are allowed to play an active role in treatment. For a program or clinician to effictively offer the Maudsley Approach they should be certified through The Training Institute for Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders. Certification training requires workshop participation and 25 hours of supervised training on 3 cases during three treatment phases. 

 

California Fight Over Affluenza Defense

California lawmaker, Mike Gatto, is proposing a new law that would ban the use of “affluenza” as a defense in criminal trials. In December, a Texas teenager was spared jail time in a fatal drunk-driving crash. The teen’s defense team’s supporting evidence was that he was incapable of understanding consequences for his choices due to affluenza

The Los Angeles-area state Assemblyman introduced a bill this week that would prohibit considering a person’s privilege when sentencing – basically, environmental conditions impacting a defendant’s behavior should be ignored. 

“The fact that a defendant did not understand the consequences of his or her actions because he or she was raised in an affluent or overly permissive household shall not be considered a circumstance in mitigation of the crime in determining the punishment to be imposed,” the bill states.

The bill is a response to a controversial Texas case. In December 2013, State District Judge Jean Boyd sentenced a 16 y/o Ethan Couch to 10 years probation for drunk driving and killing four pedestrians and injuring 11 after his attorneys successfully argued that the teen suffered from affluenza and needed rehabilitation, and not prison. The defendant was caught on surveillance video stealing beer from a store, driving with seven passengers in his father’s Ford F-350 pick-up, speeding (70 MPH in a 40 MPH zone), and had a blood alcohol content of .24‰, three times the legal limit for an adult in Texas, when he was tested 3 hrs after the accident. Traces of Valium were also in his system. Dr. G. Dick Miller, a psychologist hired as an expert witness by the defense, testified in court that the teen was a product of affluenza and was unable to connect his behavior with consequences due to his parents teaching him that wealth buys privilege and insulates him from repercussions. The rehabilitation facility near Newport Beach, California (Newport Academy) that the teen will be attending will cost his family an estimated $450,000 annually.

Back to Gatto – He said he is trying to prepare for the next time someone attempts to hide behind the affluenza defense. 

“People often think of the Legislature as too reactive,” Gatto told the L.A. Times. “Up until last year, for instance, it was not illegal to commit rape if the victim thought the rapist was her husband or boyfriend, and people said how did you let this stay on the books so long? We’re trying to be proactive.”

The bill, introduced Tuesday, January 14, may be debated in committee as early as February.

Time to Start Thinking about Cyberbullying Again

Cyberbullying: The Fist of Technology

By Mary Hannah Ellis

Most of you probably remember your school bully at each level of your education – the tall fifth grader who liked to knock over kindergartners on the playground, or the burly, egotistical jock who made everyone else feel inferior with his brash jokes. However, a student could mostly avoid these school bullies by staying out of their way. Today, technology has enabled a new, ubiquitous form of bullying called “cyberbullying.” Cyberbullying involves a minor’s harassment, tormenting, humiliation, embarrassment, threatening, or otherwise targeting of another minor via technology.

Cyberbullying occurs through a variety of media, including social networking sites, text messages, online chat services, and email messages, to name a few. Facebook and twitter are some of the most active sites for cyberbullying

Do you suspect that your child or teen is a cyberbully or a victim of cyberbullying? Here are some warning signs to consider:

Your child or teen may be engaging in cyberbullying if he/she:

• Constantly uses the computer, even at all hours of the night

• Is secretive about his/her activities on the computer

• Appears nervous when using the computer or cell phone

• Quickly stops using the computer or switches screens when someone approaches

• Becomes excessively angry when cell phone or computer privileges are revoked

• Uses multiple accounts on different websites

Your child or teen may be a victim of cyberbullying if he/she:

• Unexpectedly stops using the computer or cell phone

• Avoids talking about what he/she is doing on the computer or cell phone

• Appears nervous upon receiving a text message, chat message, or email message

• Appears angry, depressed, upset, or frustrated after using the computer or cell phone

• Withdraws from interacting with usual friends

• Seems uneasy about going to school or going out in public

Children and teens who are victims of cyberbullying are more likely to use alcohol and drugs, have lower self-esteem, skip school, experience physical bullying, have poor academic performance, and have more physical health problems. Interestingly enough, cyberbullies themselves are also more likely to be bullied in real life and to have low self-esteem. There is also a significant risk of suicidal ideation associated with cyberbullying. With very little warning, a victimized kid could snap and hurt themselves or others. Without a doubt, cyberbullies and victims of cyberbullying could benefit from counseling or psychological intervention.

Contact us to find out how we can help.

China’s Growing Appetite for New Kinds of Luxury Goods: Illegal Drugs

Original article by  

The country’s economy has exploded over the past quarter-century. And so has the market for narcotics whose use was once virtually unheard of.

An exponential curve seems to describe most things in modern China — cars, housing, Louis Vuitton handbags, ice cream, iPads.

It also describes the growth of drug use and addicts. Only 25 years ago, narcotics and illicit drug use were nearly unheard of. Today, Chinese society and government authorities are increasingly grappling with the explosion in drug use and drug addicts, as well as how to respond to the phenomenon. With more relaxed borders, increased wealth, and greater individual freedoms, drug addiction and its consequences threaten to become a permanent fixture within Chinese society. As the Brookings Institution notes in a recent report on U.S.-China counter-narcotics cooperation, what was once called “the American disease” is now a global one.

Drug Growth in China

Drug consumption has grown rapidly in the past few years. According to the Brookings Institution, the number of officially registered addicts increased from 70,000 in 1990 to more than 1.79 million at the end of 2011 — a 16 percent annual growth rate. In reality, the number of actual addicts may run as high as12 million, although the distinction between addicts and users in China is not clearly made in these statistics. Moreover, about 32 percent of China’s HIV-positive population contracted the disease via intravenous drug use. In comparison, about 18 million people in the United States reported that they needed treatment for a drug abuse problem in 2009.

Drug use trends have been shifting away from heroin and toward designer and club drugs. Yunnan province, as part of the Golden Triangle, a hotbed of opium production since the 1920s, has also been a hub for heroin trafficking. A heroin fix could run as low as 70 cents in China-Burma border towns. This made drug addiction particularly cheap. Heroin remained the drug of choice among more than 70 percent of registered drug addicts up until 2010.

However, the share of heroin among registered addicts dropped to 64.5 percent in 2011. Meanwhile, China’s Xinhua news agency reports synthetic drugs such as methamphetamines, ecstasy, and ketamine accounted for 32.7 percent of registered addicts, while other hard drugs such as cocaine have also grown in popularity. Synthetic drug trafficking is not centralized within Yunnan, with drugs instead coming from North Korea, international transport hubs, and home-grown labs. Crucially, China is a huge source of precursor chemicals like ephedrine and pseudophedrine, which are used to create methamphetamines.

The influx of drugs into China has demanded more attention from law enforcement authorities. Record-breaking drug busts happen frequently, with Hong Kong making the city’s largest-ever cocaine bust just last week. In June 2010, Chinese officials seized 1,032.36 kg of heroin and arrested 16 suspects including eight Pakistanis, two Nigerians, one Kenyan, and one Ghanaian. It was the biggest drug trafficking case in the history of Chinese drug control since 1949.

Who’s Using?

Young, wealthy urbanites as well as rural youth are driving the popularity of synthetic drug use, with people under 35 years of age comprising more than 80 percent of all addicts. Urban areas like Shanghai, for example, reportedly experienced a 20 percent increase in the number of drug addicts just last year.

But illicit drug use is not confined to one single demographic, nor to one single purpose. In late April, a commercial bus driver who later tested positive for illegal narcotics crashed his bus, killing 14 people. A national drug testing campaign soon followed, with authorities suspending the licenses of 1,436 coach and truck drivers because of drug use between March and May of 2012. While urban youth may use drugs for partying, long-haul drivers oftentimes need uppers to help stay awake. Sometimes they unwittingly consume the stuff, in forms like methamphetamine-laced cigarettes.

Changing Perceptions

China has historically held to a hard-line, black-and-white view on narcotic drugs. For example, Lin Zexu, a Qing Dynasty official who initiated a war against British opium when most Chinese authorities tacitly allowed it, is widely honored and respected in China today.

Modern Chinese attitudes towards drugs, at least among the older generations, still contain strains of Lin’s approach. Chinese President Hu Jintao initiated a “National People’s War on Illicit Drugs” in 2005. And as one Chinese sociology professor stated in the Global Times, “In my opinion, the sub-culture created by new drug users stems from the youth’s pop culture of hedonism and consumerism…to many Chinese youths, Western pop culture means experiencing happiness, physical pleasure and an open attitude toward sex. All these could be realized through taking designer drugs.”

But online, the addict is slowly acquiring a human face. The most popular documentary currently available on Youku, a Chinese video sharing site, is titled “Fenghuang Road” (凤凰路). Debuting this year with sponsorship from the Guangdong regional government, Fenghuang Road has received nearly 7 million views. The series follows nine women addicted to heroin, who prostitute themselves and purposely get struck by cars to make money in order to feed their habit.

The documentary is so popular in part because it puts a human face on a rapidly growing problem. As one Youku user writes, “Every single one of them at times display great depravity and at other times pure innocence.” Another comments, “They are all ordinary, commonplace people, but all travel less-than-ordinary roads. Society’s indifference —  we never see the corners and nooks…” Indeed, one of the women in the video became addicted because her mother was locked up in jail and her father died when she was young.

The growth of the illegal drug problem is visible even in Chinese censorship. On China’s Twitter-like weibo platforms, searches for marijuana (大麻) and specific slang for other drugs such as ketamine (K粉) are blocked, perhaps owing to the growing use of the Internet to facilitate drug sales. But official names of drugs along with non-specific slang such as “ice skating” (溜冰, referring to crystal meth) or “postage stamp” (邮票, referring to LSD) are still searchable.

Government response

In light of the recent growth in drug use, several governments are sponsoring online dialogues and information campaigns, especially those targeted at youth.

For example, various civic organizations are partnering with the Tianjin city government to host a viral anti-drug campaign on Weibo, asking youth to retweet anti-drug messages to three of their friends. Participants are entered in a raffle for the chance to win an iPad, iPods, and other electric goods. These efforts should bear some fruit. Reports indicate that much misinformation currently circulates regarding designer drugs, including the pernicious myth that such drugs are not addictive.

One thread asks netizens to contribute their own ideas to stem the growing popularity of drugs among youth. Though netizens are quick to offer ideas, there’s also an acknowledgement that drug use may be here to stay and societal attitudes must adapt. As @只有我俩的分组  states, “I have many friends who do pot…I won’t ever do it and I’ll try and convince my friends otherwise. I think this problem depends a lot on how society is developing. It will be very difficult to stop this problem quickly.”

In what may be a sign of changing attitudes, some netizens argue that drug use touches on certain root problems beyond a mere lack of self-control. As @草儿922 writes, “Education about the generation gap is crucial. Adults don’t understand what kids are thinking, leading to internal dissatisfaction from kids…adults should connect with their kids, know their thoughts; and not let their lives seem hollow so that they are led to a path that they don’t want to travel.”

How Teen Behavior Can Feel Like Derecho (and What to Do About It)

derecho is a widespread, long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving band of severe thunderstorms. Generally, derechos are convection-induced and take on a bow echo (backward “C”) form of squall line, forming in an area of wind divergence in the upper levels of the troposphere, within a region of low-level warm air advection and rich low-level moisture. They travel quickly in the direction of movement of their associated storms, similar to an outflow boundary (gust front), except that the wind is sustained and increases in strength behind the front, generally exceeding hurricane-force. A warm-weather phenomenon, derechos occur mostly in summer, especially during June and July in the Northern Hemisphere, within areas of moderately strong instability and moderately strong vertical wind shear. They may occur at any time of the year and occur as frequently at night as during the daylight hours.

1. Intense, focused storm

2. Fast moving

3. Mostly during the Summer

4. Follow other storms

5. Can sustain destructive winds for long periods of time

See any parallels yet? Ok, this may be a bit of a stretch but many teens during Summer months really start to melt down in behavior. They get bored and don’t have that regular pressure to get up and ready for school, participate in sports teams or do homework at night. No schedule = Big problems. We especially see this pop up like intense storms in June (ah, hum – just like derecho).

This is why Fonthill recommends setting up a schedule for your family for the Summer. Taking a few days to sleep in and savor the end of school is fine, but it should not be the default setting each morning till August.

1. Create a daily/weekly/monthly schedule

2. Set up times for chores, free-time, social time, family time and reading time

3. Be clear about curfews, car privileges, sleep-overs and consequences BEFORE too much Summer has gone on.

4. Eat meals together (We recommend this for all year long, actually)

5. Encourage exploration of activities, hobbies, and interests. Might even be a great time to check out some college campuses while things are calm. Many professors are still working and have way more time to hang out to talk about classes/programs.

Have a great Summer everyone!

 

Services: Concierge Service as Compliment to After-Care

In 2012, Fonthill took an unprecedented step beyond the traditional case management, beyond after-care and beyond educational consulting model to meet the complex needs of our client families around the country. After gathering feedback from professionals, clients and colleagues, Fonthill’s launched an exclusive Concierge Service as part of our Case Management package. Here is a list of our updated current offerings which is still a work in progress. We’d love your feedback on what you think is missing and what your experience has been with services like this.

Coordinating Safety/Security Measures: Scheduling and overseeing alarm installation, security company/consultation for home or travel

Obtaining Tickets: Concerts, special events and sporting events

Coordinating Transportation Services: Planning all aspects of travel to and from home, school or work

Travel and Vacation Planning: Planning all aspects of recreational travel and vacation planning

Restaurant Recommendations and Reservations: Providing specific recommendations and reservations

Pet Services: In-home pet care during school, work or anytime support is required

Personalized Shopping and Delivery: Extra set of hands or full pick up and delivery from grocery stores, local mall or delivery center like UPS or USPS

Dry Cleaning Pick-up and Delivery: One item or Ten, we’ll drop off and pick up at the dry cleaner of your choice or ours if requested

Modified House Sitting: Waiting for repair person to show? Waiting for a delivery? We’ll be there when you can not

Gift Pick Up or Return: Finding the perfect gift at the last minute or returning something to the store

Meal Delivery: Hate the idea of some random pizza delivery person? We’ll go and pick up any meal for you

Bill Paying: We will help set up or drop off payments for any bill

Auto Care: We will schedule the maintenance, drop it off and pick it up

Home Organization and Cleaning: No time for cleaning? We will coordinate with dependable cleaning service to keep your place beautiful

Prescription Pick Up: Discrete medication pick-up for both over the counter and prescription

Repair and Service Calls: Not sure who to call when something goes wrong? We’ll set up any home repairs

Sick Care: Any errands that you need while you are sick in bed

Personal Chef: Take-out got you down? No time or interest in cooking? We’ll bring in a personal chef for healthy, quality meals

Landscaping: We will set up landscape services and ensure regular service to keep your yard looking lovely, leaf removal in the Fall, snow/Ice removal in the Winter

Charter a Private Jet, Yachts or Helicopter: Want a special travel experience? We’ll charter a private jet, yacht or helicopter

Fashion and Stylist Consultant: When you need help finding your style we’ll call in the expert stylists for fashion, make-up and professional identity

Tee Time: We’ll set up tee time for you and friends at the local course and make sure everything is set for a great day on the links

Moving Assistance: We’ll pack/unpack your boxes and put it all away before you step foot in your new home

We’ve had fantastic response to these additional services which allow parents to feel confident their adult children stepping down from treatment into a transition program or independent apartment or dorm room is completed supported. From a clinical perspective, our concierge service started some interesting discussions among therapists and counselors about where the lines are and how we define ‘comprehensive care’ within the substance abuse, mental health and behavioral health world.

Blogs of Note: The Interpreted Rock by Steve Schultz

The Interpreted Rock is a blog written by our good friend Steve Schultz from Oxbow Academy in Utah. Steve was born and raised in Eugene, Oregon. He graduated from the University of Utah with a degree in psychology and received formal training as an addictions counselor. He spent several years working with health care facilities in clinical services, operations and marketing. With over twenty five years assisting families to navigate the rough waters of addiction, mental illness and the various struggles produced by wayward teens, Steve has a unique perspective and compassionate demeanor. He joined the RedCliff Ascent family in 2002. His clinical insights and customer service emphasis help him give parents a better understanding of the unique services provided by RedCliff Ascent and its sister programs.

Here’s an excerpt from a friend’s blog we thought you all may enjoy…

Monday, May 13, 2013

I was recently in Tucson Arizona meeting with the family of a student who graduated from Oxbow Academy. www.oxbowacademy.net I was traveling with the clinical director of Oxbow, Todd Spaulding LCSW.  We also had the opportunity to meet with allied health professionals in the area who work with troubled teens and their families.

As we met with folks in Tucson, I just wanted to make a brief introduction to Oxbow Academy. I shared with them that Oxbow works with families that are struggling with a son who is burdened with sexual behavioral concerns. Often this is excessive use of pornography, inappropriately touching a sibling, friend or neighbor or other compulsive sexual behaviors. About half of our students come to us with some type of Learning Disability (LD) and 60% are adopted…80 and above IQ, but socially awkward…..
For more on struggling families, Steve, Oxbow Academy or any of the other Redcliff Ascent programs, check out Steve’s blog or check out Redcliff Ascent’s list of programs.