Insider’s Guide: How to Pay for Therapeutic Boarding School (2017 UPDATE)

Before we dive into understanding the options for paying for a Therapeutic Boarding School, let’s quickly review what they are.

The Rise of Therapeutic Boarding Schools

Image result for boarding schoolAs public schools across the country have slowly been pruned back by state legislatures, funding for behavioral, emotional and academic support within schools have nearly dried up while public money is increasingly being used for private charter schools. Therefore, it’s not surprising private institutions that offer therapeutic (or quasi-therapeutic) environments like boarding schools and private schools have exploded. One of the fastest growing kinds of boarding schools is what’s called a Therapeutic Boarding School. Therapeutic boarding schools maintain the advantages of traditional boarding schools such as intimate class sizes, individual attention, great academics, developing student self-reliance, and the fun of living with peers in a completely “child-friendly” environment.

Some therapeutic boarding schools specialize in helping teens overcome certain psychological problems such as Attention Deficit Disorder, Bipolar, Asperger’s and even Depression. Others have programs for overcoming substance abuse problems or achieving weight loss. Some specialize in helping students who lack motivation get a fresh start in a nurturing environment. Most have some sort of family or parent involvement piece to ensure a team approach (ie. Weekly family therapy via phone or Skype).

While this all may sound great, there are definitely some risks and downsides (beyond the financial cost) of sending a kiddo off to therapeutic boarding school. I address those issues in great detail in another blog post. For now, let’s revisit the financial aspects…

Expense or Investment?

Parents often find themselves in a desperate situation with a troubled teenager. Their daughter runs away from home again, gets caught with the dealer down the street, crashes another car, and has yet another arrest. Parents become afraid for their teen’s lives as their teen’s risk-taking and lifestyle keeps becoming more extreme as the parents’ ability to set boundaries and expectations seemingly erodes.

It’s hard to think clearly and find solutions at times like this. Therapeutic boarding schools and therapeutic wilderness programs can provide answers, but they come at a price, with some programs running upwards of $50,000 a year.

But cost doesn’t have to be an insurmountable obstacle in getting your teen the help they need. We have helped countless parents in similar situations come up with creative ways to finance therapeutic boarding school, knowing that their child desperately needs an intervention. Therapeutic boarding schools are no longer exclusively the domain of the wealthy.

Top 10 Ways to Pay for Therapeutic Boarding School

Image result for therapeutic boarding school

Here are 10 ways families just like yours found to finance their teen’s therapeutic program:

1.   Hire a Consultant: Say what? More money? Yes, but trust me, this really will have super high ROI. Also referred to as case managers, therapeutic placement consultants or educational consultants, a good one is worth their weight in gold (a bad one is expensive and makes bad treatment recommendations). Make sure they are UNAFFILIATED with any program and have the clinical expertise to help advise and guide your family through the whole process. Some clinical educational consultants that specialize are able to handle this. A great case manager will be able to create a treatment plan, explain the process for getting a comprehensive psychological evaluation, walk with you through the intake process, support you while your teen is in the therapeutic boarding school, and coordinate discharge planning to ensure a seamless transition back to home or college. The last piece is essential – making sure your teen has everything they need to succeed after they return. Great case managers also know how to secure reimbursement from insurance providers for teens that attend therapeutic boarding schools. There are definitely some tricks (eg. Hire a case manager that’s also a licensed professional counselor and much of their work could be paid for by insurance) and inside knowledge necessary to make this happen.

Typical cost: $95 – 350/hr (some charge a flat fee of several thousand). 

2. Find the Program’s Financial Aid Officer: The private school or wilderness program should have a financial aid officer who can advise you about how to finance your child’s education. You should ask this person what programs, loans, discounts, or financial aid the school offers. Find out exactly what is included in the tuition and board bills, and if there are additional expenses such as buying uniforms or paying special fees for sports.

Typical Cost: Nothing – programs provide this to try to entice you into signing up. Beware of anything that sounds too good to be true – verify any claims they make about coverage from insurance, student grants/scholarships or loans. 

3.  Public School Funding: You may qualify for a loan through a kindergarten through 12th grade educational loan program. These loans work the same way as college loans, in that you pay what you can while your child is enrolled in the private school, and pay the rest off later. The terms of some loans let you spread out payments over 10 or 20 years. Your credit history will be a factor in securing a loan. Your school’s financial aid officer should be able to help you find such a loan.

Typical Cost: Your sanity – they will drive you crazy with the bureaucracy and take loads of time during your work day since everything in public school shuts down by 3:30pm. 

4.  Discounts for Upfront Payment: Some schools offer discounts if you pay by the year, instead of by the month. The average student stays at a therapeutic boarding school for less than two years, and wilderness programs are even shorter. A good therapeutic placement consultant/educational consultant will save you thousands of dollars by negotiating these discounts.

Typical Cost: More money upfront but no other associated costs. 

5. Tap 529: Consider using your child’s college fund first. Think of the therapeutic program as a way to get your child back on the right path toward college. Without intervention, she won’t have the grades or motivation to get through college and use her fund.

Typical Cost: Make sure there are no withdrawal penalties for use for therapeutic boarding school. 

6. Put it On Plastic: When you enroll your child in these therapeutic programs, there will be upfront expenses such as processing fees and deposits. Some parents borrow these initial payments from credit cards, especially ones that offer “frequent flier” miles. This way their child is immediately enrolled. They use their free mileage for transportation to and from the school.

Typical Cost: Beware of high interest rates if you don’t pay off your balance in full. 

7. Angel Investing: Some parents borrow the necessary funds from employers or relatives, and pay them back after securing educational loans or home equity loans.

Typical Cost: If you go through a peer-to-peer or crowdfunding site like The Lending Club or Kickstarter, count on a 5% fee for total amount funded. 

8. Health Insurance Reimbursement: Your health insurance policy may cover part of the cost of a therapeutic program as a medical expense. When you hire a case manager, they will be able to tell you how to file the paperwork and what you need from the program to ensure a speedy reimbursement.

Typical Cost: Sanity… totally lost if your insurer are jerks that don’t reimburse when and how they should. You are attempting to pull money from their cold, dead hands. Expect a fight.

9. Consult Your CPA: Some expenses for therapeutic schools and wilderness programs can be deducted from your income tax return as medical expenses. If you own your own business, you likely have WAY more creative options for deducting medical expenses.

Typical Cost: $200/hr for a good CPA to walk you through if and how to deduct from taxes.

10. Tap Home Equity: Parents have taken out second mortgages or home equity loans and then deducted their interest payments on their income tax returns.

Typical Cost: Fees, closing costs total 2-6%. It also bumps the timeframe for paying off that home back several years.

11. Public School Funding: We lied – there turns out to be 11 ways to pay for therapeutic boarding school. Is your child enrolled in public special education classes because of problems like attention deficit disorder and learning disabilities? Does your child have an “Individual Education Plan” at a public school? Do you suspect your child has learning problems that the public school cannot address? In certain cases, public school districts have to reimburse parents for private school tuitions. The Supreme Court ruled on June 22, 2009, that an Oregon school district had to reimburse a family for private school costs because the child in question could not achieve a free and appropriate education within the district. The child had not been enrolled in special education classes but was diagnosed later with attention deficit disorder.

When it comes to what matters most parents are unstoppable in finding ways to get the services and support they need. Don’t let cost be the determining factor. If your teen needs help, speak with a case manager, your trusted CPA as well as a therapeutic boarding school you’re considering and work together to find a way to get your teen back on track.

Odyssey Behavioral Healthcare Buys Pasadena Villa and Lifeskills

Odyssey Behavioral Healthcare, a partnership between Nautic Partners, LLC and CEO Scott Kardenetz, announced it completed the acquisition of residential/outpatient mental health and addictions treatment providers Pasadena Villa (TN, FL) and Lifeskills South Florida (FL). Screen Shot 2015-08-22 at 9.23.56 AM

Odyssey, headquartered in Brentwood, TN, was formed to build a diverse platform of behavioral healthcare facilities across the treatment spectrum in psychiatric and addiction care.  Scott Kardenetz is a 25-year veteran with former leadership positions at Ardent Health Services, Psychiatric Solutions and Universal Health Services. Nautic and Odyssey plan to invest $50 million of equity capital to support its strategy of growth.

Behavioral Health mergers and acquisitions experts expect this trend to continue, with a growing emphasis on the development of a full continuum of services and settings which promises to be an even bigger market than the strictly luxury-leaning residential programs that historically been the focus of consolidation. 

About Odyssey Behavioral Healthcare

Odyssey Behavioral Healthcare was formed in 2015 as a partnership between Nautic Partners and Scott Kardenetz. Odyssey’s treatment centers include Pasadena Villa and Lifeskills, which provide adult residential treatment care in three primary facilities and outpatient care in Tennessee and Florida. Odyssey will seek to expand the platform through new development and acquisition. In developing its platform, Odyssey seeks to acquire and develop treatment facility leaders in their therapeutic niche and that can benefit from senior management leadership and support.

Muir Wood Expands… Reaching for Alta Mira Recovery

Scott Sowle, the founder and executive director of Muir Wood Adolescent & Family Services (Sonoma County, CA) teamed up with private investors to acquire the residential and outpatient addiction and co-occurring disorders treatment organization from Constellation Behavioral Health. Constellation Behavioral Health operates Alta Mira Recovery Programs in California.

Muir Wood will operate as a stand-alone program focused on youth treatment, run by founder and executive director Scott Sowle. They will be expanding their residential treatment capacity by adding a residential campus for adolescent girls program. Constellation Behavioral Health operates Alta Mira Recovery Programs in California. Muir Wood will expand its residential treatment capacity for young males from its present 6 beds to 10. The adolescent male program, housed on a six-acre campus, includes weekly family programming, experiential therapies, and an accredited academic program.

Program Review: The Renfrew Center

Renfrew PicMany years ago I had the pleasure of visiting The Renfrew Center just outside of Philadelphia, PA. At first, I wasn’t sure if this was a gigantic private residence with it’s ancient stone farm house, stables, and quintessential barn. Definitely one of the more beautiful suburban locations for a treatment center I’ve seen. I had my tour of the grounds which look more like an upscale farm (in a good way), talked with the Executive Director about mental health under a giant oak tree, and got to know the program schedule as young women shuffled in and out of the various buildings. Below are more details on Renfrew with my Final Thoughts at the end. 

Background

The Renfrew Center is headquartered in has been serving women with eating disorders and behavioral health issues since 1985. As one of the nation’s first residential eating disorder facility, with 16 locations throughout the country, Renfrew claims to have worked with more than 65,000 women since their founding. The Renfrew Center has experienced it’s most significant growth in the last decade and a half have with the additional of programs across the country. 

Services

The Renfrew Center offers a full continuum of care that supports patients well beyond a residential stay. This comprehensive range of services available at most of their locations, includes day treatment, intensive outpatient and outpatient programs. The services are tailored for each patient and with her referring therapist to develop treatment plans and goals based on her unique needs.

Renfrew maintains continuity in philosophy and approach throughout the individual’s treatment, while facilitating timely transitions from one level of care to another in order to maximize treatment and insurance benefits. 

Residential services are only offered in their Philadelphia, Pa and Coconut Creek, Fl locations. 

Clients

Renfrew works with women over the age of 14 suffering from anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) and related mental health problems.

Locations

Cost
Residential – $8050 per week
They work with most insurers so a significant portion of services may be covered. 

Reviews
Employees on multiple sites give Renfrew some terrible grades for working conditions, diversity of the work force, and work-life balance. Most notably were many comments on Renfew’s seeming focus on profit and not much focus on treatment. They also described poor, untrained supervisors that did little to organize chaotic situations. 

Clients on the other hand often report having a positive experience and feeling somewhat nurtured. There were dozens of reports from clients going back to Renfrew multiple times for support. This could be viewed as good or bad. 
The New York location stood out with many, many negative reviews which highlights an ongoing theme among larger providers like Renfrew – when it comes down to actual effectiveness of a program, everything has to do with the clinicians at specific locations and very little to do with the corporate handlers up above. 

Contact

Here is a link to their online contact form which is probably the best way to get ahold of them. 

Final Thoughts
Oh how I wish programs like Renfrew could just slow down and focus more on quality. I’ve known too many therapists over the years who think poorly of Renfrew’s clinical integrity to feel comfortable referring clients that come to Fonthill. That said, it doesn’t mean women struggling with an ED should avoid Renfrew. I think programs like this have a place in the menu of options, especially if you want treatment close to a major metro area like Philadelphia. Just make sure to make a decision on more than what the admissions folks at Renfrew tell you. Look up reviews, talk with outpatient eating disorder specialists (like Dr. Joanna Marino in Washington, DC) or placement specialists (…like Fonthill ) and do your homework. It’s expensive and takes a huge amount of time to go to Renfrew so don’t rush in. 

Getting Insurance to Pay for Residential Treatment

imagesSince paying for therapeutic treatments like residential treatment, intensive outpatient program and therapeutic boarding school with insurance is a big topic we’ve broken this into a few different posts. Today, we’re starting with the basics of the health care act that tightens up the requirements for insurers. Historically, insurance paid for outpatient services and residential treatment was only for more affluent families. But thanks to the mental health parity act, insurers are not more responsible than ever for paying for higher levels of care. 

What’s the Mental Health Parity Act?

The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) requires many insurance plans that cover mental health or substance use disorders to pay for coverage for those services that are no more restrictive than the coverage for medical/surgical conditions. Basically, if they pay for medical stuff, they have to pay for mental health and substance abuse stuff – that’s the ‘parity’ part. 

What Does it Cover?

  • Copays, coinsurance, and out-of-pocket maximums
  • Limitations on services utilization, such as limits on the number of inpatient days or outpatient visits covered
  • Coverage for out-of-network providers
  • Criteria for medical necessity determinations

MHPAEA does not require insurance plans to offer coverage for mental illnesses or substance use disorders in general, or for any specific mental illness or substance use disorder. It also does not require plans to offer coverage for specific treatments or services for mental illness and substance use disorders. However, coverage that insurance plans do offer for mental and substance use disorders must be provided at parity (the same) with coverage for medical/surgical health conditions.

The original MHPAEA was enacted in October of 2008. The main purpose of MHPAEA was to fill the loopholes left by the previous Mental Health Parity Act was legislation signed into law on September 26, 1996 that requires that annual or lifetime dollar limits on mental health benefits be no lower than any such dollar limits for medical benefits offered by a group health plan.

What if My Plan is Not in Compliance?

Before escalating things and contacting state or federal officials, contact Fonthill to see how to ‘encourage’ the insurers to provide appropriate coverage (look for future blog posts on how to communicate and educate your insurers for coverage). If you still have concerns about your plan’s compliance with MHPAEA, you can contact the Feds or your State Department of Insurance. You can contact the Department of Labor at 1-866-444-3272 or http://www.dol.gov/ebsa/contactEBSA/consumerassistance.html. You can also contact the Department of HHS at 1-877-267-2323 ext 61565 or at phig@cms.hhs.gov or your State Department of Insurance at http://naic.org/.

Check back next time when we explore some tricks to getting insurance to pay for treatment – it’s what the insurance companies don’t want you to know. 

 

 

The Menninger Clinic Video

 

Here is a short promo video from the Menninger Clinic in Texas. They are an inpatient psychiatric hospital that specializes in treating individuals with complex mental illness, including severe mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders. Learn more at http://www.menningerclinic.com/

Is CRAFT the Best Unused Substance Abuse Treatment?

Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training

Today I’d like to introduce you to one of the most effective treatments/interventions for substance abuse that is rarely used and even-more rarely discussed. It’s called CRAFT and is a behavior therapy approach designed primarily for those with substance abuse issues. Developed by Nate Azrin in the 1970s, his technique focused on operant conditioning to help people learn to reduce the power of their addictions and enjoy healthy lifestyle. CRA was later combined with the FT (…family training), which equips family and friends with supportive techniques to encourage their loved ones to begin and continue treatment, and provides defenses against addiction’s damaging effects on loved ones.

The first part of this acronym – Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) was originally created for individuals with alcohol issues. Clinicians later went on to apply it to a variety of substance use disorders for more than 35 years. The clinical premise is based on operant conditioning (…type of learning in which an individual’s behavior is modified by its antecedents and consequences), basically, CRA helps rearrange the client’s life so that healthy, drug-free living becomes more interesting/stimulating and thereby competes with substance use.

CRA is designed to be a time-limited intervention. The time limit is decided upon between the clinician and client. For example, a set number of sessions (for example, 16 sessions) or time limit (for example, one year) may be decided upon either at the very beginning of therapy or within the early stages of therapy.

One major goal of CRAFT is to increase the odds of the substance user who is refusing treatment to enter treatment through close support of family members, as well as improve the lives of the concerned family members. CRAFT clinician and participants teach and reinforce the use of healthy rewards to encourage positive behaviors. Additionally,  it focuses on helping both the substance user and the family strengthen their relationships which is often torn apart.

In the model, the following terms are used:

  • Identified Patient (IP) – the individual with the substance abuse issues that is refusing treatment
  • Concerned Significant Others (CSOs) – the relevant family and friends of the IP.

Three goals

When a loved one is abusing substances and refusing to get help, CRAFT is designed to help families learn practical and effective ways to accomplish these three goals:

  1. Move their loved one toward treatment
  2. Reduce their loved one’s substance use
  3. Improve their own lives

This comprehensive behavioral program accomplishes these objectives while avoiding both the detachment espoused by Al-Anon and the confrontational style taught to families by the Johnson Institute Intervention.

CRAFT and these traditional approaches all have been found to improve CSO functioning and increase CSO-IP relationship satisfaction. However, CRAFT has proven to be significantly more effective in engaging treatment-resistant substance users in comparison to the Johnson Institute Intervention and Al-Anon (or Nar-Anon) facilitation therapy. 

CRA Breakdown of Treatment

The following CRA procedures and descriptions are typical recommended clinical content areas for the substance user:

  1. Functional Analysis of Substance
    • explore the antecedents of a client’s substance use
    • explore the positive and negative consequences of a client’s substance use
  2. Sobriety Sampling
    • a gentle movement toward long-term abstinence that begins with a client’s agreement to sample a time-limited period of abstinence
  3. CRA Treatment Plan
    • establish meaningful, objective goals in client-selected areas
    • establish highly specified methods for obtaining those goals
    • tools: Happiness Scale, and Goals of Counseling form
  4. Behavior Skills Training
    • teach three basic skills through instruction and role-playing:
    1. Problem-solving
      • break overwhelming problems into smaller ones
      • address smaller problems
    2. Communication skills
      • a positive interaction style
    3. Drink/drug refusal training
      • identify high-risk situations
      • teach assertiveness
  5. Job Skills Training
    • provide basic steps for obtaining and keeping a valued job
  6. Social and Recreational Counseling
    • provide opportunities to sample new social and recreational activities
  7. Relapse Prevention
    • teach clients how to identify high-risk situations
    • teach clients how to anticipate and cope with a relapse
  8. Relationship Counseling
    • improve the interaction between the client and his or her partner

Communication 

With CRAFT, CSOs are trained in various strategies, including positive reinforcement, various communication skills and natural consequences. One of the big pieces that has a lot of influence over all the other strategies is positive communication. 

Here are the seven steps in the CRAFT model for implementing positive communication strategies.

  1. Be Brief
  2. Be Positive
  3. Refer to Specific Behaviors
  4. Label your Feelings
  5. Offer an Understanding Statement – For example, “I appreciate that you have these concerns, … [or] I understand that you really want to talk right now, and that this feels urgent, … [or] I would love to be there for you.”
  6. Accept Partial Responsibility – This step “is really designed to decrease defensiveness on the part of your loved one. … It’s not about accepting responsibility for things you are not responsible for. … [Rather, it’s to] direct you towards the piece that you can own for yourself. … [For example, ] what you can take responsibility for are the ways that you communicate,” etc.
  7. Offer to help

Take home message – Help decrease defensiveness on the part of the loved one that you are speaking to, and increase the chances that your message is really going to be heard—so, increasing the ability that you have to really get across the message that you want. 

Consequences with specific limits/expectations being in place is essential in terms of communicating your message, but it’s also really important, maybe even more so, to be consistent in following through with those consequences and rewards.

Al-Anon 

As an organization, Al-Anon does not currently adopt, hold, or promote the view that CSOs can make a positive, direct, and active contribution to arrest compulsive drinking, which is the opposite premise of CRAFT. Al-Anon is a fellowship with a focus on helping families and friends, themselves, without promoting a direct intervention process for alcoholics. Because “no one ever graduates” from Al-Anon, it can be viewed as an open-ended program, not time-limited.

Al-Anon view

Regarding the CSO’s relationship to alcoholism and sobriety, the view from the Al-Anon organization can be summarized:

  1. PowerlessnessAl-Anon‘s First Step promotes a powerless view for families and friends, “We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.”
  2. Disease viewAl-Anon writes, “As the American Medical Association will attest, alcoholism is a disease.” Al-Anon also states, “Although it can be arrested, alcoholism has no known cure.”
  3. Three C’sAl-Anon has a dictum called “the Three C’s—I didn’t cause alcoholism; I can’t control it; and I can’t cure it.”
  4. Loving detachment. Al-Anon “advocates ‘loving detachment’ from the substance abuser.”
  5. Family illnessAl-Anon writes, “Alcoholism is a family disease,” and “we believe alcoholism is a family illness and that changed attitudes can aid recovery.”

Summary

CRAFT is not perfect and is not easy to implement partially due to lack of clinician training and also because of having multiple people involved (ie. IP, concerned others, and clinician). Programs, agencies and clinicians may not even be aware of CRAFT if you ask so if you or a loved one are in need of a non-residential approach that’s well researched and effective, find a substance abuse therapist able and willing to use it. 

Program Review: Veritas Collaborative

In April 2014, Dr. Marino and I visited Veritas Collaborative in Durham, NC, a 2 year old for profit eating disorder treatment program specializing in children and adolescents. Don’t let the age of this program fool you – they clearly know what they’re doing and have some clinical and business heavy-weights in their corner.VC dining pic

 

Below is a write-up of our experiences, thoughts and additional info we gathered together just for you. As always, our perspective as clinicians may be uniquely different from those of perspective clients or their parents. We highly encourage you to do your own research before committing to any program.  

What They Do

Veritas provides Inpatient, Residential Treatment and Partial Hospitalization for adolescents and children with eating disorders. What is key in our description is what is not listed. This means, during a time when other programs do everything for anyone, Veritas has committed to specializing. They have 26 inpatient/acute residential beds and 12 partial hospitalization beds. Below is a description of the three different levels of care (directly from the Veritas Collaborative site).

Inpatient hospitalization is the most intensive level of treatment available. Inpatient treatment is necessary for those who need frequent nursing care or are medically unstable (as determined by vital signs, lab abnormalities, or general physical and psychological condition). Patients who are severely entrenched in their disorders are depressed, suicidal, or are a danger to themselves or others, are also appropriate for this level of care. These patients see a medical doctor daily.

Acute Residential Treatment is a 24-hour monitored, structured treatment program for medically stable patients who still need constant supervision. Nursing care is still provided around the clock, but patients see doctors less frequently. Some individuals are admitted directly to residential treatment while others first go through inpatient treatment and them move to the residential program.VC bdrm pic

The Partial Hospitalization level of care is appropriate for patients who need structured programming but do not need 24-hour supervision. Patients participate in individual and group therapy, structured activities, and programming around meals similar to what is offered in the inpatient and residential programs. Some patients admit directly to this level of care, but many “step down” from the residential or inpatient levels, as partial programming still provides a high amount of structure and support. These patients are medically stable, and can move more readily while maintaining appropriate, non-disordered behaviors without direct supervision.

Another key feature to the Veritas program is the pervasive use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), both of which are evidence-based treatments for eating disorders and co-occurring mental health issues.

Who They Serve

Veritas serves children and adolescents (both male/female) 10-19 years old from around the country experiencing eating disorders. It’s rare for an eating disorder program to serve younger adolescents and children which is a huge plus. It’s also less common for a program to work with male clients. VC pic

Location

Veritas is located at 615 Douglas St #500, Durham, NC 27705. They sit right next to Duke University. They are 20 minutes from the Raleigh-Durham International Airport (super, super easy airport to travel through) and 2 hours from the Charlotte airport. The parking deck is easily accessed from the road. The building is nondescript but that’s works nicely for those seeking a more discrete treatment experience. 

Fees + Insurance + Financing 

Yes, they accept insurance and will work with you to figure out what is covered.

As with most treatment centers, there are many outside financing agencies that specifically work with mental, behavioral and substance abuse programs.

A quick word about their fees – they wouldn’t say. Not a peep about daily or monthly rates which, in our humble opinion is no bueno. See below in the Reviews section for commentary on this. It’s not unusual for programs to defer questions about cost but they eventually give us an idea (normally as a monthly rate). But not Veritas. 

Reviews

It’s really disappointing and feels a bit awkward when we have a hard time finding negative reviews of a program. Either they’ve done a good job of scrubbing the internet of nasty feedback or…. they actually provide great service. From all around the intertubes we scoured parent blogs, professional review sites as well as the more general review sites. So what’s out there? What’s the overall judgement of this fledgling treatment center? Mostly just really nice praise for the staff, treatment and program as a whole. The thing that kept on coming up over and over was Veritas’s involvement of the whole family – which happens to be another key feature they told us about on our tour. Family work is at the core of how they impact the client’s treatment. 

One negative in our view is discussion of cost. We really, really like programs to be up front about what the estimated costs for service will be. It’s not that we expect a solid dollar amount since we know as well as the next professional that expenses can go up or down depending on loads of variables. But what we do want to see is an effort towards transparency, especially with pricing. When asked for pricing we were told ‘it depends‘ but would not commit to a daily or monthly rate and nothing is listed on their site. 

Other than the cost issue we experienced, there’s not much else for us to complain about. We’ll definitely continue looking for bad reviews and update this post. 

Contact Information

Reach out to Kelly Robinson at krobinson@veritascollaborative.com or 919.698.8574 to learn more or take a tour. You can also schedule a tour directly from their site here: Schedule a Tour.

Final Thoughts

Overall, we encourage perspective clients to take a tour and consider the program. It’s best to higher an educational consultant or case manager to go with you. They will ask detailed questions you may not think to ask or just feel way too uncomfortable to ask. This is a decision you should not make alone. 

Program Review: Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center

You may have recently heard of Timberline Knolls for the high-profile admission of Ke$ha on Friday, January 3, 2014. Or maybe you heard of Timberline Knolls when Demi Lovato was raving about it to MTV when she was discharged several years earlier. Both of these and many other celebs are drawn to Timberline Knolls for their quiet, discrete environment with a good reputation for getting young women healthy.  imgres

Reviews

We take reviews from the internet lightly since they could have been written by competitors (yes, that really happens), written by staff posing as program alums or written by actual alums. Unfortunately – there’s just no way to know for sure so be cautious when considering the reviews. Most of the negative reviews for Timberline Knolls across these sites indicates pretty good clinical program, really nice setting, but super high pricing which may not be very transparent (not currently listed on their site) and significant problems with the Timberline Knolls administration for various issues. 

Google Reviews: 2.8/10 (10 Reviews)
Yelp Reviews: 5/5 (2 Reviews)
EdTreatmentReviews.com: Mixed
BBB.com: 8 Complaints
ComplaintsBoard.com: 6 Complaints 

Who They Serve

They admit women ages 12 – 60’s to extremely discrete care (lots of celebrities). Timberline Knolls recognizes that recovery from eating disorders, addiction and the other conditions is a lifelong process for women. Women require different tools as they move through different phases of life. Their customized program addresses the unique treatment needs of women at various stages of life. 

Many adult women come to Timberline Knolls after having been in recovery for many years. They offer programming tailored to the specific needs of mature women, including those of mothers with children at home. Many clients come to them having been triggered by complicated life events like a death in the family, divorce or significant career challenges.

Residents live in separate lodge settings based upon their age. Adolescent girls attend school at the state-approved Timberline Knolls Academy. They benefit from the tight integration between the classroom and a therapeutic living environment that supports their social, developmental and clinical needs. Check out their video here

Location

timberline-knolls-campusTimberline Knolls (40 Timberline Drive Lemont, Illinois 60439) is located on 43 wooded acres just a few miles southwest of Chicago, less than a half-hour’s drive from either O’Hare or Midway Airport. An interesting side-note: The campus received recognition for its beauty from the American Institute of Landscape Architects. The tranquil grounds contain a lake and reflecting ponds, an historic art studio, comfortable contemporary residential facilities, and outdoor activity fields.

Residents are housed in one of four residential lodges, (Oak, Maple, Pine and Willow), which are staffed 24 hours a day with nursing and clinical support staff. Timberline Knolls also employs on-campus security staff 24 hours a day to protect the safety and privacy of both residents and staff.


Fees, Insurance and Financing 

$875 per day. The daily rate is inclusive for all clinical, educational, psychiatric, behavioral/milieu, nursing, and expressive therapeutic services on a 24 hour, 7 days a week basis. Individual, family, and group therapies are included. It also includes all meals and lodging. The daily rate is based on a tuition model of monthly billing. Non-included services are off-site medical services such as pediatrics, gynecology, dentistry, dermatology, hospitalization, urgent care, emergency care, urine/blood/lab work, etc., and medications. If any of these services are required, the specific provider of those services will directly invoice the parent(s)/guardian(s) or their insurance. 

If applicable Timberline Knolls works with a client’s insurance company (some in-network, some out-of-network) to get as much of the fees covered. Admissions counselors will help clients investigate their benefits.

If insurance is not an option and out-of-pocket is out-of-reach, contact Timberline Knolls and ask about financing.

Final Thoughts

Timberline Knolls had a bumpy start when they started in 2005. The original founders were two pretty shady characters who have since been replaced by reputable investors that seem to be focused on providing a good quality program to upper and middle class women. Most of the feedback we gathered from online and colleagues was that they do a descent job working with the clinical issues but could be a lot more upfront about expenses. They also received several negative marks for having difficult admin staff. These issues could be more about personality (clients as well as the staff) and less about policies that impact every client.

Overall, we encourage perspective clients to take a tour and consider the program. It’s best to higher an educational consultant or case manager to go with you. They will ask detailed questions you may not think to ask or just feel way too uncomfortable to ask. This is a decision you should not make alone.