Trump Presidency: What this Means for Your Mental Health Care

 

I’m going to touch upon a few things with some educated guessing since at this point we have no information on any strategy for changing the healthcare system, including the Affordable Healthcare Act (aka. Obamacare).

Medications

Big Pharma may be big winners in this election. There is a good chance regulation will decrease which means drugs will be pushed through the regulatory process. There is also a very good chance your medications will get more expensive Obamacare will be directly targeted for dismantling. At this point, the federal government has some impact on what drug makers charge (at least for Medicare, Tricare and Medicaid clients). There is a very real fear that whenever there is a conflict between industry and clients/customers, the Trump administration may very well choose big business.

Affordable Health Care Act – Obamacare

This was one of Trump’s big targets and will likely be a focal point as the Trump administration sharpens its agenda in 2017. One big problem with Trump’s over simplistic promise to ‘get rid of Obamacare’ is that it took years and years to recalibrate and organize healthcare at the federal, state and corporate levels. Billions of dollars went into this law. Changing the law will take years and years and more billions. Insurance rates have gone up for many people and that hurts. But, the dismantling of Obamacare will likely have a dramatic and catastrophic effect on providers, clients and hospitals. The prediction at this point is that while the current system is experiencing growing pains, the replacement will likely compromise the little leverage we have over insurance companies meaning they will go back to charging whatever they want and having pre existing conditions the hallmark of how they keep people from needed care.

Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA)

The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) is a federal law that generally prevents group health plans and health insurance issuers that provide mental health or substance use disorder benefits from imposing less favorable benefit limitations on those benefits than on medical benefits. With the Trump administration taking the reigns in a few months, there is the possibility the act could be dismantled in favor of insurance companies, most of which have fought, lied and deceived policyholders from the very beginning of the law in 2009. What this means for you: Insurers may no longer be required to pay for comparable level of mental health and substance abuse treatment as you have within your medical policy.

I will continue to monitor Trump policy changes and post again soon. Till then, take a deep breath, stock up on canned goods and sweep out your bomb shelter. We’re likely in for a wild ride.

The Affordable Health Care Act (aka Obamacare): How it impacts Mental Health and Substance Abuse Service

The Affordable Health Care Act (aka Obamacare) has been ramping up over the last few months and goes into full-throttle (Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment starts October 1, 2013). Here are some of the important changes the healthcare law impacts. 

Expansion

The Affordable Care Act will expand mental health and substance use disorder benefits  and parity protections for 62 million Americans. Mental health and substance use disorder services: This includes behavioral health treatment, counseling, and psychotherapy, prescription drugs. It also covers services and devices to help you recover if you are injured, or have a disability or chronic condition. This includes physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, psychiatric rehabilitation, and more. The healthcare act also includes a huge Medicaid/Medicare expansion to provide coverage to millions more Americans currently without insurance. Here are just a few other bullet points of the healthcare act going into effect soon: 

• National goals have been set to identify and reduce mental health care disparities in the U.S.

• More federally-qualified mental health care facilities will be made available and funded.

• There will be an increased focus on telemedicine, which will facilitate mental health services and collaborative efforts from a distance, through the use of telecommunication technologies.

• Additional funding will be allocated to mental health organizations, such as SAMHSA.

• State Health Homes will be made available for individuals recovering from substance abuse and mental health disorders.

• School-based mental health programs will be initiated for child mental health care.

• Grants will be allocated exclusively for training more mental health care professionals.

• No-cost and low-cost preventative screenings will include mental health services.

• Mental health benefits will be included in the Medicaid expansion.

Prevention

Most health plans must now cover preventative services like depression screening for adults and behavioral assessments for children at no cost. All Marketplace plans and many other plans must cover the following list of preventive services without charging you a copayment or coinsurance. This is true even if you haven’t met your yearly deductible. This applies only when these services are delivered by a network provider.

Pre-Existing Conditions

Starting in 2014, health insurance plans will not be able to deny clients customers coverage or charge extra for pre-existing health conditions including mental illness. 

Let’s Talk Access

Access through for those un- or under-insured is through Exchanges. Exchanges are set up through state websites designed to make it easy for people to find health coverage. Each state will have one. The District and 16 states, including Maryland, are running their own exchanges. The rest are either partnering with the federal government or, as in Virginia’s case, relying on the federal government to operate their exchanges. To find the correct site, go to www.healthcare.gov.

To learn more about how the Affordable Healthcare Act may impact services with Fonthill Counseling, please contact us with specific questions or concerns.