5 Stupid Things My Teen is Doing

For this installment of Stupid Things, we start off nice and easy and then drop down into some weird crap. Kids are bored. I get it. We clearly need more devices since the iPhone 6 Plus, iPad, Mac, XBox, Playstation and all the other tech stuff just isn’t stimulating enough. We humbly present to you more stupid things teens are doing…

images (2)1. GoPro
GoPro is a small video device created for skateboarders, mountain bikers and surfers to self-film their adventures. GoPro went public this year. Why does this matter? Because their marketing budget exploded and with it, their target market which is now anyone who wants to film them self doing anything. Just let your imagination wander and you’ll soon realize why gopro-ing could be a problem for teens. They do some stupid prank at school, film it, post it on instagram and, voila! Instant evidence for the local DA to use against them.   

 

 

2. Vodka Eyeballingimages (1)
Pouring vodka in your eye sockets in order to get drunk faster and more efficiently is another dumb but real thing. It makes sense to the adolescent brain since the mouth is just soooo far away, best to use an eye. 

 

 

3. Beezin
Let’s continue our ‘eye’ theme. It’s called “Beezin,” (why do stupid teen things always leave off the last ‘g’?). Here’s the how-to – rub Burt’s Bees lip balm on the eyelids. It’s just that simple! No complicated steps like some of our other Stupid Things. The peppermint oil found in the balm creates a tingling sensation that some teens say enhances the feeling when they are already drunk or high. Others say its a way to keep them alert after a long night (…because that thing the brain and body do to restore itself each night is just soooo inconvenient, what’s that called? Oh, right! Sleep). If your kid is prone to stupid acts, look for pink-eye type irritation. Kids site the ‘natural’ ingredients as evidence of it’s safety but a Burt’s Bees rep argued “There are lots of natural things that probably shouldn’t go in eyes — dirt, twigs, leaves, food — and our lip balm.” 

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4. Purple Drank
Just when you thought the good ‘ole days (1990’s) were behind us, creative teens desperate to feel something other than a stable middle class existence have resurrected use of cough syrup. Here’s the recipe – cough syrup, Mountain Dew (or Red Bull, etc) and Jolly Ranchers. Not sure what they’ll die from first, the dextromethorphan, guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine or Type II Diabetes. Keep an eye out for pilfered medicine cabinets (and pantries). 

 

 

5. Butt Chugging 
Yes, leave it only to bored American teens to come up with this one. It’s simple – take a tampon, soak it in alcohol, and insert into your butt. And yes, kids really do this.

That’s it folks. Join us next time for the sad but humorous exploration of how tomorrow’s leaders are spending their time today. 

China’s Growing Appetite for New Kinds of Luxury Goods: Illegal Drugs

Original article by  

The country’s economy has exploded over the past quarter-century. And so has the market for narcotics whose use was once virtually unheard of.

An exponential curve seems to describe most things in modern China — cars, housing, Louis Vuitton handbags, ice cream, iPads.

It also describes the growth of drug use and addicts. Only 25 years ago, narcotics and illicit drug use were nearly unheard of. Today, Chinese society and government authorities are increasingly grappling with the explosion in drug use and drug addicts, as well as how to respond to the phenomenon. With more relaxed borders, increased wealth, and greater individual freedoms, drug addiction and its consequences threaten to become a permanent fixture within Chinese society. As the Brookings Institution notes in a recent report on U.S.-China counter-narcotics cooperation, what was once called “the American disease” is now a global one.

Drug Growth in China

Drug consumption has grown rapidly in the past few years. According to the Brookings Institution, the number of officially registered addicts increased from 70,000 in 1990 to more than 1.79 million at the end of 2011 — a 16 percent annual growth rate. In reality, the number of actual addicts may run as high as12 million, although the distinction between addicts and users in China is not clearly made in these statistics. Moreover, about 32 percent of China’s HIV-positive population contracted the disease via intravenous drug use. In comparison, about 18 million people in the United States reported that they needed treatment for a drug abuse problem in 2009.

Drug use trends have been shifting away from heroin and toward designer and club drugs. Yunnan province, as part of the Golden Triangle, a hotbed of opium production since the 1920s, has also been a hub for heroin trafficking. A heroin fix could run as low as 70 cents in China-Burma border towns. This made drug addiction particularly cheap. Heroin remained the drug of choice among more than 70 percent of registered drug addicts up until 2010.

However, the share of heroin among registered addicts dropped to 64.5 percent in 2011. Meanwhile, China’s Xinhua news agency reports synthetic drugs such as methamphetamines, ecstasy, and ketamine accounted for 32.7 percent of registered addicts, while other hard drugs such as cocaine have also grown in popularity. Synthetic drug trafficking is not centralized within Yunnan, with drugs instead coming from North Korea, international transport hubs, and home-grown labs. Crucially, China is a huge source of precursor chemicals like ephedrine and pseudophedrine, which are used to create methamphetamines.

The influx of drugs into China has demanded more attention from law enforcement authorities. Record-breaking drug busts happen frequently, with Hong Kong making the city’s largest-ever cocaine bust just last week. In June 2010, Chinese officials seized 1,032.36 kg of heroin and arrested 16 suspects including eight Pakistanis, two Nigerians, one Kenyan, and one Ghanaian. It was the biggest drug trafficking case in the history of Chinese drug control since 1949.

Who’s Using?

Young, wealthy urbanites as well as rural youth are driving the popularity of synthetic drug use, with people under 35 years of age comprising more than 80 percent of all addicts. Urban areas like Shanghai, for example, reportedly experienced a 20 percent increase in the number of drug addicts just last year.

But illicit drug use is not confined to one single demographic, nor to one single purpose. In late April, a commercial bus driver who later tested positive for illegal narcotics crashed his bus, killing 14 people. A national drug testing campaign soon followed, with authorities suspending the licenses of 1,436 coach and truck drivers because of drug use between March and May of 2012. While urban youth may use drugs for partying, long-haul drivers oftentimes need uppers to help stay awake. Sometimes they unwittingly consume the stuff, in forms like methamphetamine-laced cigarettes.

Changing Perceptions

China has historically held to a hard-line, black-and-white view on narcotic drugs. For example, Lin Zexu, a Qing Dynasty official who initiated a war against British opium when most Chinese authorities tacitly allowed it, is widely honored and respected in China today.

Modern Chinese attitudes towards drugs, at least among the older generations, still contain strains of Lin’s approach. Chinese President Hu Jintao initiated a “National People’s War on Illicit Drugs” in 2005. And as one Chinese sociology professor stated in the Global Times, “In my opinion, the sub-culture created by new drug users stems from the youth’s pop culture of hedonism and consumerism…to many Chinese youths, Western pop culture means experiencing happiness, physical pleasure and an open attitude toward sex. All these could be realized through taking designer drugs.”

But online, the addict is slowly acquiring a human face. The most popular documentary currently available on Youku, a Chinese video sharing site, is titled “Fenghuang Road” (凤凰路). Debuting this year with sponsorship from the Guangdong regional government, Fenghuang Road has received nearly 7 million views. The series follows nine women addicted to heroin, who prostitute themselves and purposely get struck by cars to make money in order to feed their habit.

The documentary is so popular in part because it puts a human face on a rapidly growing problem. As one Youku user writes, “Every single one of them at times display great depravity and at other times pure innocence.” Another comments, “They are all ordinary, commonplace people, but all travel less-than-ordinary roads. Society’s indifference —  we never see the corners and nooks…” Indeed, one of the women in the video became addicted because her mother was locked up in jail and her father died when she was young.

The growth of the illegal drug problem is visible even in Chinese censorship. On China’s Twitter-like weibo platforms, searches for marijuana (大麻) and specific slang for other drugs such as ketamine (K粉) are blocked, perhaps owing to the growing use of the Internet to facilitate drug sales. But official names of drugs along with non-specific slang such as “ice skating” (溜冰, referring to crystal meth) or “postage stamp” (邮票, referring to LSD) are still searchable.

Government response

In light of the recent growth in drug use, several governments are sponsoring online dialogues and information campaigns, especially those targeted at youth.

For example, various civic organizations are partnering with the Tianjin city government to host a viral anti-drug campaign on Weibo, asking youth to retweet anti-drug messages to three of their friends. Participants are entered in a raffle for the chance to win an iPad, iPods, and other electric goods. These efforts should bear some fruit. Reports indicate that much misinformation currently circulates regarding designer drugs, including the pernicious myth that such drugs are not addictive.

One thread asks netizens to contribute their own ideas to stem the growing popularity of drugs among youth. Though netizens are quick to offer ideas, there’s also an acknowledgement that drug use may be here to stay and societal attitudes must adapt. As @只有我俩的分组  states, “I have many friends who do pot…I won’t ever do it and I’ll try and convince my friends otherwise. I think this problem depends a lot on how society is developing. It will be very difficult to stop this problem quickly.”

In what may be a sign of changing attitudes, some netizens argue that drug use touches on certain root problems beyond a mere lack of self-control. As @草儿922 writes, “Education about the generation gap is crucial. Adults don’t understand what kids are thinking, leading to internal dissatisfaction from kids…adults should connect with their kids, know their thoughts; and not let their lives seem hollow so that they are led to a path that they don’t want to travel.”

IECA Webinar: Working for Entitled, Demanding Families Part 1 of 2

On July 9, 2013 Fonthill Counseling Founder and Clinical Director Rob Danzman presented the IECA Webinar Working for Entitled, Demanding Families: Marketing, Customer Service, and Management Strategies. Below are some highlights from his presentation as well as responses to some great questions asked. The full presentation can be heard at at IECA Webinar Series.

1. Clients vs Customers

Focus on Customer Experience: How does you client experience your service from the first phone call or email all the way through till paying the final bill or discharge.

Entire Company is Part of Customer Service and Marketing: The entire company, whether it’s just you and your spouse or a dozen employees – everyone should be coached (…and trained) to act as a cohesive, comprehensive customer service and marketing team. Everyone should know their roles, goals and objectives.

Build Evangelists: Satisfied Families are more valuable than a sales team, advertising campaigns or even speaking gigs. When you satisfy the customer’s expectations, they leave happy. But when you EXCEED customer’s expectations, you turn them in to evangelists. Think about this…When was the last time anyone bragged about their recent Microsoft product? What about an Apple product? One company somewhat satisfies customers while the other generally exceeds expectations.
Reward Dedication with Desired Reinforcer rather than Assumed Reinforcer: Basically, find out what motivates customers. What they want more of and what they desperately want to avoid. This will provide insight into their behavior, goals, thoughts, and feelings. It also offers information on how to leverage customers when they get stuck.

2. Marketing

Connect to 5 Senses (…especially Music and Visuals): Memories, social connections and emotions are highly associated with our senses (ie. Song on the radio triggers flashback to highschool). Use this evidence-based approach on your website, literature and in your sessions to develop strong rapport and make great progress.
Make Them Feel Special (Special Access): Instead of talking about all the families you’ve served, focus on language that makes them feel like they are the only clients you have. Give them your direct cell number. Tell them to call you on weekends and evenings if they need anything. Go above and beyond with giving them access to you and your staff.
They Demand Immediate Response: Make sure to have an internal policy to respond to questions, concerns, and feedback within 24 hrs.
They Demand Quality Behind the Scenes (eg. Granite in Kitchen): When I go to tour therapeutic programs around the country, I insist on checking out the kitchens. Kitchens are great litmus tests for whether a program’s quality goes deep or is just superficial.
Differentiate with Niche, not Consensus: While you want to listen loudly to your customers’ needs, do not let it dictate your services and how you work. The Crysler Minivan was famously denied production when it was first conceived of by an engineer/designer. Crysler management said “No customer is asking us for anything bigger than a station wagon.” Customers don’t know what they really want until you give it to them.
Quality vs. Volume ( CHANEL vs. Old Spice): Similar to Niche vs. Consensus above, focus on a few things you can do really well. Don’t be all things to all people. Don’t focus on volume unless you plan on being the Wal-Mart of your industry.
Educate vs. Selling: Selling something involves pushing a product or service with the not-so-subtle goal of exchanging your goods for their money. Educating a customer involves ignoring the sale and focusing on their needs, wants, fears and goals. It’s a focus on finding congruent solutions between the customer and either something you can provide or someone else’s service. This develops a level of trust unparalleled between customer and professional.
Benefits vs. Price: Similar to above, focus on the benefits and attributes of your services and products rather than price. We rarely discuss price and rarely lower our price. Instead, we keep the conversation about matching the customer’s goals with what we offer.
Make it Exclusive: If everyone had access to purchasing BMW’s (ie. lower costs, cheaper product, etc.) they would not be coveted. Does anyone brag about being able to finally buy their dream Camry? Limit access to your service through pricing strategy, quality and limits to who you work with.
Next time…Check back for Part 2 when we go over Customer Needs vs Wants and Training Yourself and Staff

 

Fonthill Founder Interview on StayHappilyMarried.com

Fonthill Counseling Founder and Clinical Director, Rob Danzman, was recently interviewed by the good folks at StayHappilyMarried.com.

The topic was how wealth impacts marriages and parenting. Rob talked about several key issues:

  • The different types of wealth and how they influence behavior, thoughts and feelings
  • How underserved the affluent generally are when it comes to counseling and couples work
  • How wealth impacts parenting
  • Three main problems – Lack of Boundaries, Lack of Trust, Lack of Consequences
  • What parents, clinicians and professionals can do to repair marriages and improve parenting

To read the transcript or listen to the whole interview, head over here.

Spoiled College Kids = Bad Grades?

Here is a modified article on the surprising findings of a researcher who looked at the impact of wealth and college success. We also see these findings may be relevant to private school and boarding school.

Much discussion about higher education assumes that the children of wealthy parents have all the advantages, and they certainly have many. But a new study reveals an area where they may be at a disadvantage. The study found that the more money (in total and as a share of total college costs) that parents provide for higher education, the lower the grades their children earn.

The findings suggest that the students least likely to excel are those who receive essentially blank checks for college expenses.

The study — “More Is More or More Is Less?” — is by Laura Hamilton, an assistant professor in the School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts at the University of California at Merced, and was just published by the American Sociological Review (abstract available here), the flagship journal of the American Sociological Association.

Hamilton used data from three federal databases and compared parental contributions and grades. She argues in the paper that high wealth levels are associated with higher parental financial contributions, but also with other factors that contribute to academic performance (such as better high school educations, high aspirations for higher education, and so forth). Without controlling for socioeconomic status, those other factors may mask differences in patterns based solely on parental financial contributions.

And here she found — across all types of four-year institutions — the greater parental contributions were, the lower the student grades were.

This finding backs the idea that parental financial support can act as a “moral hazard” in that students make decisions about how seriously to take their studies without having personally made the investment of cash in their educations.

The impact of parental contributions on grades was lower (but still present) at highly competitive institutions. Generally the grades were lowest for students with high levels of support from their parents at private, out-of-state and more expensive colleges.

Before parents reading this article cancel those spring semester tuition checks and Facebook message their college-age kids to get jobs, there are two important caveats to the study.

One is that the study found a positive association (even controlling for other factors) between increased parental contributions and graduation over five years. In an interview, Hamilton said that she explained this finding (even if apparently contradictory with the results on grades) because those with minimal levels of parental support have a much more difficult job paying for college, and those who can’t pay, can’t graduate. “Kids who don’t have funds, they don’t stay,” she said.

The second caution Hamilton offered about parental spending on higher education comes out of the qualitative research project that prompted the quantitative work just published. Hamilton explored the impact of parental financial support on a women’s floor of a dormitory of a Midwestern public university, tracking student grades and interviewing parents. She found the pattern confirmed by her national data: many parents provided high levels of support only to be shocked (and, she said, angry) that their daughters weren’t earning good grades.

A second pattern Hamilton discovered in that study of one dormitory (and that she believes is the case nationally) is that the lowest grades were earned by children whose parents essentially supported them without much discussion of student responsibilities. The negative impact of high levels of parental financial support was mitigated or eliminated by parents who set clear expectations for their children about grades, graduating on time or other issues, she said. This extends to all levels of parental support for students.

The problem is that most parents who give a lot of money are apparently less than demanding about expectations. Then, Hamilton said, the students find college to be a great experience, and not one they are going to endanger by failing. “They say ‘I want to stay there, but I’m not going to work too hard while I’m here.’ They stay in college but dial down their academic effort.”

Hamilton stressed that she wasn’t arguing that parents who can afford to pay for college stop doing so. Rather, she said, they need to focus on what they are paying for, and to link their financial support to goals. What parents need to do, Hamilton said, is “to make smart investments.” That means evaluating the expense, and not just assuming that all spending during the college years has equal value. In other words, she said, a parent of means is wise to offer support so a child can take a meaningful but unpaid internship, but the parent isn’t going to see any payoff from providing cash for spring break vacations.

Read the whole article: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/01/14/study-finds-increased-parental-support-college-results-lower-grades#ixzz2I3XElIRZ