IECA Webinar: Working for Entitled, Demanding Families Part 1 of 2

On July 9, 2013 Fonthill Counseling Founder and Clinical Director Rob Danzman presented the IECA Webinar Working for Entitled, Demanding Families: Marketing, Customer Service, and Management Strategies. Below are some highlights from his presentation as well as responses to some great questions asked. The full presentation can be heard at at IECA Webinar Series.

1. Clients vs Customers

Focus on Customer Experience: How does you client experience your service from the first phone call or email all the way through till paying the final bill or discharge.

Entire Company is Part of Customer Service and Marketing: The entire company, whether it’s just you and your spouse or a dozen employees – everyone should be coached (…and trained) to act as a cohesive, comprehensive customer service and marketing team. Everyone should know their roles, goals and objectives.

Build Evangelists: Satisfied Families are more valuable than a sales team, advertising campaigns or even speaking gigs. When you satisfy the customer’s expectations, they leave happy. But when you EXCEED customer’s expectations, you turn them in to evangelists. Think about this…When was the last time anyone bragged about their recent Microsoft product? What about an Apple product? One company somewhat satisfies customers while the other generally exceeds expectations.
Reward Dedication with Desired Reinforcer rather than Assumed Reinforcer: Basically, find out what motivates customers. What they want more of and what they desperately want to avoid. This will provide insight into their behavior, goals, thoughts, and feelings. It also offers information on how to leverage customers when they get stuck.

2. Marketing

Connect to 5 Senses (…especially Music and Visuals): Memories, social connections and emotions are highly associated with our senses (ie. Song on the radio triggers flashback to highschool). Use this evidence-based approach on your website, literature and in your sessions to develop strong rapport and make great progress.
Make Them Feel Special (Special Access): Instead of talking about all the families you’ve served, focus on language that makes them feel like they are the only clients you have. Give them your direct cell number. Tell them to call you on weekends and evenings if they need anything. Go above and beyond with giving them access to you and your staff.
They Demand Immediate Response: Make sure to have an internal policy to respond to questions, concerns, and feedback within 24 hrs.
They Demand Quality Behind the Scenes (eg. Granite in Kitchen): When I go to tour therapeutic programs around the country, I insist on checking out the kitchens. Kitchens are great litmus tests for whether a program’s quality goes deep or is just superficial.
Differentiate with Niche, not Consensus: While you want to listen loudly to your customers’ needs, do not let it dictate your services and how you work. The Crysler Minivan was famously denied production when it was first conceived of by an engineer/designer. Crysler management said “No customer is asking us for anything bigger than a station wagon.” Customers don’t know what they really want until you give it to them.
Quality vs. Volume ( CHANEL vs. Old Spice): Similar to Niche vs. Consensus above, focus on a few things you can do really well. Don’t be all things to all people. Don’t focus on volume unless you plan on being the Wal-Mart of your industry.
Educate vs. Selling: Selling something involves pushing a product or service with the not-so-subtle goal of exchanging your goods for their money. Educating a customer involves ignoring the sale and focusing on their needs, wants, fears and goals. It’s a focus on finding congruent solutions between the customer and either something you can provide or someone else’s service. This develops a level of trust unparalleled between customer and professional.
Benefits vs. Price: Similar to above, focus on the benefits and attributes of your services and products rather than price. We rarely discuss price and rarely lower our price. Instead, we keep the conversation about matching the customer’s goals with what we offer.
Make it Exclusive: If everyone had access to purchasing BMW’s (ie. lower costs, cheaper product, etc.) they would not be coveted. Does anyone brag about being able to finally buy their dream Camry? Limit access to your service through pricing strategy, quality and limits to who you work with.
Next time…Check back for Part 2 when we go over Customer Needs vs Wants and Training Yourself and Staff