5 Things Your Education Consultant/Case Manager Should Be Doing Right Now

This is our raw, irreverent guide on what in our humble opinion education consultants and case managers should be doing right now to provide the highest quality service to you. This list is valid regardless of the type of mental, behavioral health or substance abuse treatment you or your loved one is receiving (eg. therapeutic wilderness program, therapeutic boarding school, individual outpatient therapy, psychological assessment). If you go through the list and your well-compensated professional is providing you with anything less than what we discuss below, copy and paste this into an email and let them know you’ll keep them hired only if they get on board.

1. Consistent Contact

When we first started Fonthill, we were so focused on accomplishing all the goals and objectives we developed with parents and families that we failed to keep everyone informed and on the same page. We learned from our mistakes that weekly contact (at a minimum) is essential. Your education consultant / case manager should be providing you (and the whole team) with regular email or text updates. These are not updates you should need to respond to, just information letting you know an application was submitted, insurance claim was accepted or that the psychologist doing your son’s assessment will be available about 30 minutes earlier if that works for you. Parents count on us to keep them informed.

2. Proactive Planning

Here is another mistake we made. Our teams are experts on working with behavioral acting out, crisis, intervention, parenting, and families but what we quickly learned we needed to do just as well was developing a treatment plan that included more than just what the parents thought was the issue. We expanded our planning WAY beyond what we estimated our involvement to be so that after we had worked ourselves out of a job (…another hallmark of good work) the family had a set of instructions, a road map, a guide if you will on who should be doing what and by when. Make sure that your education consultant / case manager is developing a plan that considers the big picture since treatment and life do not stop when the professional’s final payment is received. Seriously, they should be mapping out way far into the future to mitigate obstacles and pot-holes you are not even thinking of (eg. Financial literacy for your son entering substance abuse treatment).

3. Saying ‘No’

A really good way to determine if your education consultant / case manager is worth their weight in gold (…or Rhodium) is how often they say ‘no’ to 1. New Clients, 2. Current Clients and 3. Professionals on your team.

Let me explain. New clients – We make it very clear to perspective clients that not everyone that contacts us becomes a client. We could become the Wal-Mart of family services but quality would go WAY down. Education consulting, case management, family counseling and our parent education and consulting would become commodities. Many desperate professionals say ‘yes’ when leads are low and expenses are high (…McMansions are cheap ya know). Current clients – A really valuable and important education consultant and case manager is hired to set a course, develop a plan and make sure the heading if followed. Parents often, with the best intentions, attempt to deviate from the course when kids get unruly or their own fears start to percolate. Professionals – One of  our most important jobs as case managers is working out issues behind the scenes (eg. Setting a limit on the ‘add-ons’ a program may want to push on parents). Being able to effectively and respectfully say ‘no’ to other professionals is an essential skill that should be in your case manager’s repertoire.

4. Billing Fairly

Have you ever lost your mind when you looked over your hospital bill from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center that showed that the Aspirin they gave you cost $1000? Yeah, we don’t like that either. We think billing should be fair and transparent. There are many, many families that we work with that make a bazillion dollars. There are also just as many families that are have very modest incomes. We charge the same for them all and we are upfront with our costs. We also don’t think it’s appropriate to gouge our clients with ridiculous initial consultation fees ($5,000 for an initial meeting? Get real.) We also don’t like contracts for X number of months. Life happens and we know families sometimes need to make drastic changes. Being on the hook for a service that’s supposed to solve problems and not create new ones is important to consider when signing up with an education consultant  or case manager. We recommend the shortest term necessary with flexibility built in. For instance, rather than expecting payment everytime we meet, we invoice clients monthly for the work completed (…not for the upcoming month like a landlord). Make sure you understand your bill and that all the expenses are for things you agreed to.

5. Maintaining Boundaries

Oh this one really gets us frustrated. To be able to have the healthiest working relationship with your education consultant and case manager they should constantly maintain professional boundaries similar to Licensed Professional Counselors – No dual roles (eg. Your professional is not also your CPA) and No merging of personal/professional relationships (eg. Your professional is not discussing non-work related issues). This may seem like small stuff but, think about it this way. You hired this person to provide objective analysis and recommendations to advance your family through some obstacle. This creates what in mental health parlance is referred to as a power differential. A power differential is when one party has greater power than the other (eg. Judge vs. defendant). In this case, the professional has power over the parents because the parents are in a vulnerable position, meaning they are counting on advice, but also relying on the professional to protect their confidential information, reputation as well as their emotional and psychological health. If your education consultant has crossed any line that’s not clearly stated in their scope of service, consider talking with them directly and asking them to respect the professional relationship you want with them by limiting the personal sharing and interaction. It may feel uncomfortable, but consider this – what happens if you are not happy with something they did? What happens if the treatment program they recommended turns out to be crap? It’s much easier to confront someone who has maintained professional boundaries throughout the process.

This list is not exhaustive but a starting point to ensure you have some reasonable expectations of what to expect in your relationship with an education consultant/case manager. Contact us at Fonthill if you need more help or if you’re not sure how to best use your current professional support.

Tax Deductions for Substance Abuse Treatment

The cost of drug and alcohol rehab can be high, and if you opt for a high-end addiction treatment center or therapeutic wilderness program to ensure that you have access to everything you or your loved one needs during recovery, you can end up with a massive bill. Health insurance may cover part of the costs, and you can always get financing to cover the rest, but when it comes to tax time, how can you recoup the costs?

As of right now, there are ways to claim the cost of drug and alcohol rehab on your tax return – as long as you itemize your deductions on Schedule A. In fact, any medical and dental cost is deductible in the same way, as long as it exceeds more than 7.5 percent of your adjusted gross income for the year. For example, if your adjusted gross income is $50,000, you can deduct the expenses that exceed $3750. So if your treatment costs $10,000, then you can deduct $6250.

So which addiction treatment costs are included as acceptable medical expenses that can be deducted? According to §213(d)(1)(A) of the Tax Code, medical costs are defined as “the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease.(For the full list of deductible treatments, interventions, etc. go to the Tax Code link above)

Ok, not a lot of guidance in there. The only other directives point out that illegal treatments or operations are not tax deductible and that a few services are definitely included. Some of the ones that relate to drug addiction treatment include x-rays, hospital and nursing services – pretty much any diagnostic, evaluation, and treatment services. If you are enrolled in a drug detox program or a drug addiction treatment program and incur costs for psychological treatment or medical treatment – even an ambulance ride somewhere in the process of healing and getting better – then your costs are covered under the circumstances described above.

Does drug and alcohol addiction qualify as a medical and/ or psychological disease according to the IRS? Absolutely. Even if the general public is split on the question, the medical establishment and the IRS are not. They agree that costs incurred in the treatment of drug addiction is absolutely a medical expense and as such qualifies as a deduction for those who itemize and whose expenses exceed 7.5 percent of their income.

If you would like assistance filing your taxes in a year that you pay for drug and alcohol rehab, tax accountants like this one can help. If you are seeking a drug rehab for yourself or your loved one, Fonthill can help.