Program Tour: Pros and (Not Many) Cons of Edge Learning Community

Findings of a Summer Day Tour at Edge Learning and Collegiate Community in Chicago

Among the towering buildings and rattle of platformed trains in downtown Chicago is a vibrant support community for young adults called Edge Learning Community. I met with their Director of Business Development, Chris McClaughlin, on a toasty Summer day recently. He was kind enough to meet me in the downstairs lobby  – a modern but elegant entry convenient to one of the major stops for the Chicago Transit Authority (map here).  

Up we went to their expansive and deceptively large common area. Sleek, clean furniture juxtaposed the industrial feel of the exposed brick walls and weathered hardwood floors. This was just the beginning of an exceptional space and community.

To the left, Chris escorted me to their rooftop ‘backyard’ area complete with grass (actually astro turf), outdoor projector for movies, lounge chairs and hot tub. Sweet views of Chicago were the bonus. The space felt way more private than you would imagine. Despite giant glass and steel over shadowing the old building on multiple sides, one has a sense of serenity. Not a bad start to a tour.  

After talking about some of the history of the buildings and infamous Chicago characters, we cut through the inside common area out onto another patio on the West side. This was a super-call outdoor bar and grilling area which felt more like a bistro than therapeutic program. Chris pointed out the buildings where Al Capone had secret get-a-ways, we talked about the history of the city and then, after the late-morning sun started to cook us, we got around to talking about the program. It’s center around what they refer to as Core Competencies: Whole Brain Thinking (Rational & Irrational Thinking); Creativity and Continuous Learning; Effective Communication; Leading within Teams; Community Stewardship; Sustaining Healthy Relationships; Self Care; and Management of Resources and Technology. Rather than cutting and pasting from their site, I recommend going to their site to read through the details.

After lunch in the kitchen/dining room, we toured the rooms that, to be honest, felt way more like high-end apartments with large kitchens. High ceilings and plenty of space for single or multiple students make each room a great space for studying, hanging-out and even cooking. Chris and I spoke about the limitations of many programs that only accept young adults in recovery. Edge is well-prepared and works often with folks struggling with addiction but they don’t think of themselves as a substance abuse program. It is not for those in the very early stages of recovery. It is definitely not for those that do not have basic internal locus of control and responsibility for their behaviors. The heavy lifting of support for each resident is performed by coaches who, for all intents and purposes are therapists as shared with me by their clinical director Jason Wynkoop. They are highly trained and competent to work with young adults struggling with organization, recovery, mental health issues and behavioral support needs.

Our tour and day ended high above Chicago talking about Edge, it’s program and the bright future they have since so many older, more established programs are just not meeting the current needs of students today. To summarize, here are some Pros and Cons to consider. If you need more insight, contact us. We’re happy to share what we know to help you make the best decision.

Pros

Aesthetics: Fantastic common areas (no crappy This-End-Up blocky wood sofas that smell like dog). Mature, hip and nicely appointed apartments with great views . As a side-note, I had no idea This-End-Up was still in business until I researched the link for this review. Wow.

Location: If you are freaked out by silence, if you can’t stand wilderness, and if you prefer the hyper-rhythmic flow of the city, Edge is where you need to be, especially if you are in college and need support.  It’s close to huge parks, museums, great restaurants, entertainment and tons of public transportation. Cars are definitely not needed here.

Independence: For those needing collaborative but not overbearing support from super competent professionals, Edge is your place. There is an expectation you are in school and keeping busy during the day.

Cons

Model: It’s not a bad thing but if you are looking for a super traditional transition program this may not be for you (or your son or daughter). Their collaborative approach rocks for some but may feel overwhelming to those that just want a bed for their head.

Location: If the cacophony of big city life wears you down, this is not the program for you. Edge’s DNA is inseparably tied to the fast-paced hustle of 2.715 million neighbors. Fit is a big deal when looking for support during the already stressful (and fun) time of college and young adulthood.

To be honest, there just aren’t many Cons – nothing here is inherently bad. Quality, in this case, is clearly defined by fit. For those ready for the interdependence of young adulthood we highly recommend visiting Edge for one of their informational meetings/weekends, talking to alum and getting a tour before committing to Edge. Once you know it’s the right place for you, you’ll experience the intense, positive support of this fantastic, innovative community.

 

IECA Webinar: Working for Entitled, Demanding Families Part 1 of 2

On July 9, 2013 Fonthill Counseling Founder and Clinical Director Rob Danzman presented the IECA Webinar Working for Entitled, Demanding Families: Marketing, Customer Service, and Management Strategies. Below are some highlights from his presentation as well as responses to some great questions asked. The full presentation can be heard at at IECA Webinar Series.

1. Clients vs Customers

Focus on Customer Experience: How does you client experience your service from the first phone call or email all the way through till paying the final bill or discharge.

Entire Company is Part of Customer Service and Marketing: The entire company, whether it’s just you and your spouse or a dozen employees – everyone should be coached (…and trained) to act as a cohesive, comprehensive customer service and marketing team. Everyone should know their roles, goals and objectives.

Build Evangelists: Satisfied Families are more valuable than a sales team, advertising campaigns or even speaking gigs. When you satisfy the customer’s expectations, they leave happy. But when you EXCEED customer’s expectations, you turn them in to evangelists. Think about this…When was the last time anyone bragged about their recent Microsoft product? What about an Apple product? One company somewhat satisfies customers while the other generally exceeds expectations.
Reward Dedication with Desired Reinforcer rather than Assumed Reinforcer: Basically, find out what motivates customers. What they want more of and what they desperately want to avoid. This will provide insight into their behavior, goals, thoughts, and feelings. It also offers information on how to leverage customers when they get stuck.

2. Marketing

Connect to 5 Senses (…especially Music and Visuals): Memories, social connections and emotions are highly associated with our senses (ie. Song on the radio triggers flashback to highschool). Use this evidence-based approach on your website, literature and in your sessions to develop strong rapport and make great progress.
Make Them Feel Special (Special Access): Instead of talking about all the families you’ve served, focus on language that makes them feel like they are the only clients you have. Give them your direct cell number. Tell them to call you on weekends and evenings if they need anything. Go above and beyond with giving them access to you and your staff.
They Demand Immediate Response: Make sure to have an internal policy to respond to questions, concerns, and feedback within 24 hrs.
They Demand Quality Behind the Scenes (eg. Granite in Kitchen): When I go to tour therapeutic programs around the country, I insist on checking out the kitchens. Kitchens are great litmus tests for whether a program’s quality goes deep or is just superficial.
Differentiate with Niche, not Consensus: While you want to listen loudly to your customers’ needs, do not let it dictate your services and how you work. The Crysler Minivan was famously denied production when it was first conceived of by an engineer/designer. Crysler management said “No customer is asking us for anything bigger than a station wagon.” Customers don’t know what they really want until you give it to them.
Quality vs. Volume ( CHANEL vs. Old Spice): Similar to Niche vs. Consensus above, focus on a few things you can do really well. Don’t be all things to all people. Don’t focus on volume unless you plan on being the Wal-Mart of your industry.
Educate vs. Selling: Selling something involves pushing a product or service with the not-so-subtle goal of exchanging your goods for their money. Educating a customer involves ignoring the sale and focusing on their needs, wants, fears and goals. It’s a focus on finding congruent solutions between the customer and either something you can provide or someone else’s service. This develops a level of trust unparalleled between customer and professional.
Benefits vs. Price: Similar to above, focus on the benefits and attributes of your services and products rather than price. We rarely discuss price and rarely lower our price. Instead, we keep the conversation about matching the customer’s goals with what we offer.
Make it Exclusive: If everyone had access to purchasing BMW’s (ie. lower costs, cheaper product, etc.) they would not be coveted. Does anyone brag about being able to finally buy their dream Camry? Limit access to your service through pricing strategy, quality and limits to who you work with.
Next time…Check back for Part 2 when we go over Customer Needs vs Wants and Training Yourself and Staff