Insider’s Guide: How to Pay for Therapeutic Boarding School (2017 UPDATE)

Before we dive into understanding the options for paying for a Therapeutic Boarding School, let’s quickly review what they are.

The Rise of Therapeutic Boarding Schools

Image result for boarding schoolAs public schools across the country have slowly been pruned back by state legislatures, funding for behavioral, emotional and academic support within schools have nearly dried up while public money is increasingly being used for private charter schools. Therefore, it’s not surprising private institutions that offer therapeutic (or quasi-therapeutic) environments like boarding schools and private schools have exploded. One of the fastest growing kinds of boarding schools is what’s called a Therapeutic Boarding School. Therapeutic boarding schools maintain the advantages of traditional boarding schools such as intimate class sizes, individual attention, great academics, developing student self-reliance, and the fun of living with peers in a completely “child-friendly” environment.

Some therapeutic boarding schools specialize in helping teens overcome certain psychological problems such as Attention Deficit Disorder, Bipolar, Asperger’s and even Depression. Others have programs for overcoming substance abuse problems or achieving weight loss. Some specialize in helping students who lack motivation get a fresh start in a nurturing environment. Most have some sort of family or parent involvement piece to ensure a team approach (ie. Weekly family therapy via phone or Skype).

While this all may sound great, there are definitely some risks and downsides (beyond the financial cost) of sending a kiddo off to therapeutic boarding school. I address those issues in great detail in another blog post. For now, let’s revisit the financial aspects…

Expense or Investment?

Parents often find themselves in a desperate situation with a troubled teenager. Their daughter runs away from home again, gets caught with the dealer down the street, crashes another car, and has yet another arrest. Parents become afraid for their teen’s lives as their teen’s risk-taking and lifestyle keeps becoming more extreme as the parents’ ability to set boundaries and expectations seemingly erodes.

It’s hard to think clearly and find solutions at times like this. Therapeutic boarding schools and therapeutic wilderness programs can provide answers, but they come at a price, with some programs running upwards of $50,000 a year.

But cost doesn’t have to be an insurmountable obstacle in getting your teen the help they need. We have helped countless parents in similar situations come up with creative ways to finance therapeutic boarding school, knowing that their child desperately needs an intervention. Therapeutic boarding schools are no longer exclusively the domain of the wealthy.

Top 10 Ways to Pay for Therapeutic Boarding School

Image result for therapeutic boarding school

Here are 10 ways families just like yours found to finance their teen’s therapeutic program:

1.   Hire a Consultant: Say what? More money? Yes, but trust me, this really will have super high ROI. Also referred to as case managers, therapeutic placement consultants or educational consultants, a good one is worth their weight in gold (a bad one is expensive and makes bad treatment recommendations). Make sure they are UNAFFILIATED with any program and have the clinical expertise to help advise and guide your family through the whole process. Some clinical educational consultants that specialize are able to handle this. A great case manager will be able to create a treatment plan, explain the process for getting a comprehensive psychological evaluation, walk with you through the intake process, support you while your teen is in the therapeutic boarding school, and coordinate discharge planning to ensure a seamless transition back to home or college. The last piece is essential – making sure your teen has everything they need to succeed after they return. Great case managers also know how to secure reimbursement from insurance providers for teens that attend therapeutic boarding schools. There are definitely some tricks (eg. Hire a case manager that’s also a licensed professional counselor and much of their work could be paid for by insurance) and inside knowledge necessary to make this happen.

Typical cost: $95 – 350/hr (some charge a flat fee of several thousand). 

2. Find the Program’s Financial Aid Officer: The private school or wilderness program should have a financial aid officer who can advise you about how to finance your child’s education. You should ask this person what programs, loans, discounts, or financial aid the school offers. Find out exactly what is included in the tuition and board bills, and if there are additional expenses such as buying uniforms or paying special fees for sports.

Typical Cost: Nothing – programs provide this to try to entice you into signing up. Beware of anything that sounds too good to be true – verify any claims they make about coverage from insurance, student grants/scholarships or loans. 

3.  Public School Funding: You may qualify for a loan through a kindergarten through 12th grade educational loan program. These loans work the same way as college loans, in that you pay what you can while your child is enrolled in the private school, and pay the rest off later. The terms of some loans let you spread out payments over 10 or 20 years. Your credit history will be a factor in securing a loan. Your school’s financial aid officer should be able to help you find such a loan.

Typical Cost: Your sanity – they will drive you crazy with the bureaucracy and take loads of time during your work day since everything in public school shuts down by 3:30pm. 

4.  Discounts for Upfront Payment: Some schools offer discounts if you pay by the year, instead of by the month. The average student stays at a therapeutic boarding school for less than two years, and wilderness programs are even shorter. A good therapeutic placement consultant/educational consultant will save you thousands of dollars by negotiating these discounts.

Typical Cost: More money upfront but no other associated costs. 

5. Tap 529: Consider using your child’s college fund first. Think of the therapeutic program as a way to get your child back on the right path toward college. Without intervention, she won’t have the grades or motivation to get through college and use her fund.

Typical Cost: Make sure there are no withdrawal penalties for use for therapeutic boarding school. 

6. Put it On Plastic: When you enroll your child in these therapeutic programs, there will be upfront expenses such as processing fees and deposits. Some parents borrow these initial payments from credit cards, especially ones that offer “frequent flier” miles. This way their child is immediately enrolled. They use their free mileage for transportation to and from the school.

Typical Cost: Beware of high interest rates if you don’t pay off your balance in full. 

7. Angel Investing: Some parents borrow the necessary funds from employers or relatives, and pay them back after securing educational loans or home equity loans.

Typical Cost: If you go through a peer-to-peer or crowdfunding site like The Lending Club or Kickstarter, count on a 5% fee for total amount funded. 

8. Health Insurance Reimbursement: Your health insurance policy may cover part of the cost of a therapeutic program as a medical expense. When you hire a case manager, they will be able to tell you how to file the paperwork and what you need from the program to ensure a speedy reimbursement.

Typical Cost: Sanity… totally lost if your insurer are jerks that don’t reimburse when and how they should. You are attempting to pull money from their cold, dead hands. Expect a fight.

9. Consult Your CPA: Some expenses for therapeutic schools and wilderness programs can be deducted from your income tax return as medical expenses. If you own your own business, you likely have WAY more creative options for deducting medical expenses.

Typical Cost: $200/hr for a good CPA to walk you through if and how to deduct from taxes.

10. Tap Home Equity: Parents have taken out second mortgages or home equity loans and then deducted their interest payments on their income tax returns.

Typical Cost: Fees, closing costs total 2-6%. It also bumps the timeframe for paying off that home back several years.

11. Public School Funding: We lied – there turns out to be 11 ways to pay for therapeutic boarding school. Is your child enrolled in public special education classes because of problems like attention deficit disorder and learning disabilities? Does your child have an “Individual Education Plan” at a public school? Do you suspect your child has learning problems that the public school cannot address? In certain cases, public school districts have to reimburse parents for private school tuitions. The Supreme Court ruled on June 22, 2009, that an Oregon school district had to reimburse a family for private school costs because the child in question could not achieve a free and appropriate education within the district. The child had not been enrolled in special education classes but was diagnosed later with attention deficit disorder.

When it comes to what matters most parents are unstoppable in finding ways to get the services and support they need. Don’t let cost be the determining factor. If your teen needs help, speak with a case manager, your trusted CPA as well as a therapeutic boarding school you’re considering and work together to find a way to get your teen back on track.

Elements Behavioral Health Expanding

Elements Behavioral Health has been actively expanding as evidenced by the purchase of  Park Bench Group Counseling in New Jersey and the opening of Brightwater Landing in Pennsylvania right outside Harrisburg and Hershey.

Elements portfolio are also ramping up programs to meet increased market demands. Centers in Texas and Tennessee are adding new services, and a detox program in Florida launching in the first quarter of the year.

On The Market?

Within all this activity, observers are reporting that Elements is for sale. Reuters reported in December 2014 that private equity and venture capital firm Frazier Healthcare is potentially looking to sell Elements, and that  investment bank Jefferies Group LLC has been retained to facilitate the next steps. Across the entire industry, valuations are up, and the market is ripe for activity.

Elements has been estimated to be worth $30 million in EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) and get 10x more in actual negotiations.

Acquisitions!

Founded by two clinicians in 2006 the newly acquired Park Bench in New Jersey provides day treatment and intensive outpatient services, including an individualized aftercare program (…often a big missing piece in substance abuse treatment).

Elements was targeting the Northeast for some time, particularly in the New York/New Jersey Tristate area because of population density and the need for young adult treatment. The services they’re providing, which are addiction and co-occurring disorders, fit with the Elements family of programs.

Elements has an existing property in York, Pa., and this month, it added a new location, Brightwater Landing in Lancaster County – west of Philadelphia. The center is on a 150-acre campus that lends itself to treatment interventions that require more outdoor space as well as landscape features appropriate to experiential and adventure-based therapies.

Treatment at Brightwater will include equine therapy and a ropes course to enable clients to process the emotional and behavioral parts of their addiction. The experiences will address not just the substance-use disorders but also the underlying trauma that contributes to using. The center will offer primary psychiatric and active mental health models of care – early on-ramp for those seeking treatment for the first time. 

Elements Behavioral Health is part of a trend within the industry where small mom and pop outpatient and treatment centers built over the last few decades are being gobbled up by some big players. We expect more merger and acquisition activity in 2015.

Is CRAFT the Best Unused Substance Abuse Treatment?

Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training

Today I’d like to introduce you to one of the most effective treatments/interventions for substance abuse that is rarely used and even-more rarely discussed. It’s called CRAFT and is a behavior therapy approach designed primarily for those with substance abuse issues. Developed by Nate Azrin in the 1970s, his technique focused on operant conditioning to help people learn to reduce the power of their addictions and enjoy healthy lifestyle. CRA was later combined with the FT (…family training), which equips family and friends with supportive techniques to encourage their loved ones to begin and continue treatment, and provides defenses against addiction’s damaging effects on loved ones.

The first part of this acronym – Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) was originally created for individuals with alcohol issues. Clinicians later went on to apply it to a variety of substance use disorders for more than 35 years. The clinical premise is based on operant conditioning (…type of learning in which an individual’s behavior is modified by its antecedents and consequences), basically, CRA helps rearrange the client’s life so that healthy, drug-free living becomes more interesting/stimulating and thereby competes with substance use.

CRA is designed to be a time-limited intervention. The time limit is decided upon between the clinician and client. For example, a set number of sessions (for example, 16 sessions) or time limit (for example, one year) may be decided upon either at the very beginning of therapy or within the early stages of therapy.

One major goal of CRAFT is to increase the odds of the substance user who is refusing treatment to enter treatment through close support of family members, as well as improve the lives of the concerned family members. CRAFT clinician and participants teach and reinforce the use of healthy rewards to encourage positive behaviors. Additionally,  it focuses on helping both the substance user and the family strengthen their relationships which is often torn apart.

In the model, the following terms are used:

  • Identified Patient (IP) – the individual with the substance abuse issues that is refusing treatment
  • Concerned Significant Others (CSOs) – the relevant family and friends of the IP.

Three goals

When a loved one is abusing substances and refusing to get help, CRAFT is designed to help families learn practical and effective ways to accomplish these three goals:

  1. Move their loved one toward treatment
  2. Reduce their loved one’s substance use
  3. Improve their own lives

This comprehensive behavioral program accomplishes these objectives while avoiding both the detachment espoused by Al-Anon and the confrontational style taught to families by the Johnson Institute Intervention.

CRAFT and these traditional approaches all have been found to improve CSO functioning and increase CSO-IP relationship satisfaction. However, CRAFT has proven to be significantly more effective in engaging treatment-resistant substance users in comparison to the Johnson Institute Intervention and Al-Anon (or Nar-Anon) facilitation therapy. 

CRA Breakdown of Treatment

The following CRA procedures and descriptions are typical recommended clinical content areas for the substance user:

  1. Functional Analysis of Substance
    • explore the antecedents of a client’s substance use
    • explore the positive and negative consequences of a client’s substance use
  2. Sobriety Sampling
    • a gentle movement toward long-term abstinence that begins with a client’s agreement to sample a time-limited period of abstinence
  3. CRA Treatment Plan
    • establish meaningful, objective goals in client-selected areas
    • establish highly specified methods for obtaining those goals
    • tools: Happiness Scale, and Goals of Counseling form
  4. Behavior Skills Training
    • teach three basic skills through instruction and role-playing:
    1. Problem-solving
      • break overwhelming problems into smaller ones
      • address smaller problems
    2. Communication skills
      • a positive interaction style
    3. Drink/drug refusal training
      • identify high-risk situations
      • teach assertiveness
  5. Job Skills Training
    • provide basic steps for obtaining and keeping a valued job
  6. Social and Recreational Counseling
    • provide opportunities to sample new social and recreational activities
  7. Relapse Prevention
    • teach clients how to identify high-risk situations
    • teach clients how to anticipate and cope with a relapse
  8. Relationship Counseling
    • improve the interaction between the client and his or her partner

Communication 

With CRAFT, CSOs are trained in various strategies, including positive reinforcement, various communication skills and natural consequences. One of the big pieces that has a lot of influence over all the other strategies is positive communication. 

Here are the seven steps in the CRAFT model for implementing positive communication strategies.

  1. Be Brief
  2. Be Positive
  3. Refer to Specific Behaviors
  4. Label your Feelings
  5. Offer an Understanding Statement – For example, “I appreciate that you have these concerns, … [or] I understand that you really want to talk right now, and that this feels urgent, … [or] I would love to be there for you.”
  6. Accept Partial Responsibility – This step “is really designed to decrease defensiveness on the part of your loved one. … It’s not about accepting responsibility for things you are not responsible for. … [Rather, it’s to] direct you towards the piece that you can own for yourself. … [For example, ] what you can take responsibility for are the ways that you communicate,” etc.
  7. Offer to help

Take home message – Help decrease defensiveness on the part of the loved one that you are speaking to, and increase the chances that your message is really going to be heard—so, increasing the ability that you have to really get across the message that you want. 

Consequences with specific limits/expectations being in place is essential in terms of communicating your message, but it’s also really important, maybe even more so, to be consistent in following through with those consequences and rewards.

Al-Anon 

As an organization, Al-Anon does not currently adopt, hold, or promote the view that CSOs can make a positive, direct, and active contribution to arrest compulsive drinking, which is the opposite premise of CRAFT. Al-Anon is a fellowship with a focus on helping families and friends, themselves, without promoting a direct intervention process for alcoholics. Because “no one ever graduates” from Al-Anon, it can be viewed as an open-ended program, not time-limited.

Al-Anon view

Regarding the CSO’s relationship to alcoholism and sobriety, the view from the Al-Anon organization can be summarized:

  1. PowerlessnessAl-Anon‘s First Step promotes a powerless view for families and friends, “We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.”
  2. Disease viewAl-Anon writes, “As the American Medical Association will attest, alcoholism is a disease.” Al-Anon also states, “Although it can be arrested, alcoholism has no known cure.”
  3. Three C’sAl-Anon has a dictum called “the Three C’s—I didn’t cause alcoholism; I can’t control it; and I can’t cure it.”
  4. Loving detachment. Al-Anon “advocates ‘loving detachment’ from the substance abuser.”
  5. Family illnessAl-Anon writes, “Alcoholism is a family disease,” and “we believe alcoholism is a family illness and that changed attitudes can aid recovery.”

Summary

CRAFT is not perfect and is not easy to implement partially due to lack of clinician training and also because of having multiple people involved (ie. IP, concerned others, and clinician). Programs, agencies and clinicians may not even be aware of CRAFT if you ask so if you or a loved one are in need of a non-residential approach that’s well researched and effective, find a substance abuse therapist able and willing to use it. 

Virginia Senator Deeds Stabbed by Son (…And How it Could Have Been Avoided)

Virginia Senator Creigh Deeds was Stabbed by his 24 year old son Austin (Gus) Deeds  who then killed himself with a shotgun at their rural home just West of Charlottesville, Va.. Austin Deeds had just been ‘psychologically’ evaluated just hours before at Bath Community Hospital under an Emergency Custody Order (ECO). The ECO is only good for 4 hours with a possible 2 hour extension if ordered by the magistrate.  Hospital staff stated, working within the maximum 4 hour window, they were unable to find a treatment facility to address Austin Deeds’ psychiatric needs despite several hospitals reporting they did in fact have availability.

Here is some analysis/questions from someone (me) that’s been in this profession for years. I also provide some ideas of solutions if you know of someone struggling with a similar situation:

1. Diagnoses: If the hospital was looking for a treatment facility this means that something the evaluator found indicated Austin was either a threat to himself or others or needed a a level of medical intervention not available at the current hospital. I’m also thinking about the type of evaluation that was conducted and why it was even done at BCH, what the evaluator’s credentials are, and how it was reviewed with Austin and his family. 

2. Discharge: If there were no options (which there clearly were), I wonder if and how the hospital communicated their findings from the evaluation as well as their concerns about safety to the parents and authorities. I’m also wondering what kind of discharge meeting took place. When a client is stepping down from a hospital or residential setting, we always facilitate a comprehensive treatment team meeting to talk about discharge so everyone leaves understanding what the next steps are – action steps. When we work with families struggling with similar issues, we don’t wait for the hospital to give updates. But as mental health professionals, we are able to navigate the bureaucracy much easier and get clear answers much faster. 

3. Responsibility: Providers, whether big hospitals or little, ole’ therapists, have an ethical and legal responsibility to communicate to authorities if a patient is in eminent danger. So who is responsible here? If you ask the hospital, they’ll probably point fingers until the next news cycle. If you ask an attorney, they’ll go through the policy and procedures for the hospital regarding intake, evaluations, referrals, discharge, etc. and anyone of making decisions in that chain could be liable.

4. Intervention (Placement Options): The hospital staff at BCH clearly did not consider referring outside of the traditional placement list (psych beds at hospitals). It’s unlikely that it was due to financial constraints and certainly not due to a lack of treatment centers as some have speculated (Yes, there are certainly a lack of medicaid-funded psych units in VA). There are facilities all over the country that are extremely well-equipped to accept, stabilize and work with patients just like Austin. Most hospitals, though, follow a tired, out-dated protocol of calling three near-by psych hospitals to find out if they have a bed avail. If they here no at all three, patient is discharged with a list of therapists to contact to set up an appointment. Sound ridiculous? You’re right. 

5. Solutions: In my humble opinion, Austin would be alive today if earlier intervention had been provided by a treatment team including a psychologist, psychiatrist, therapist, and case manager. The psychologist provides the initial psychological evaluation to identify the issues, what is causing them, and create a specific list of interventions for the rest of the team. The psychiatrist (though in limited supply in Bath Co, VA) performs an initial psychiatric (medical/medication) evaluation and identify what, if any, medication is necessary to compliment any individual counseling being performed. The therapist provides weekly counseling either in-office or in the family’s home to address areas identified within the psychological evaluation. The case manager is the project manager for everyone and is on-call 24/7. This person also facilitates regular treatment team meetings to ensure updates are provided to the family and all professionals. For instance, if the therapist starts seeing signs of bizarre thinking patterns which are historically correlated with dangerous behavior, the case manager can alert the rest of the team and monitor the client more closely while also increasing the frequency of support. If a higher level of care (ie. psychiatric hospitalization) is recommended by any member of the team, the case manager not only identifies a placement but completes all intake paperwork. The case manager also provides psychoeducation to the family to help them understand the client’s diagnoses and what they can do to most effectively support him. 

If you or someone you know is in a similar mess, do not assume your local hospital has the expertise to handle the situation. Contact a mental health professional to find services that can manage the entire project from assessment to placement to discharge and aftercare. 

Program Tour: Pros and (Not Many) Cons of Edge Learning Community

Findings of a Summer Day Tour at Edge Learning and Collegiate Community in Chicago

Among the towering buildings and rattle of platformed trains in downtown Chicago is a vibrant support community for young adults called Edge Learning Community. I met with their Director of Business Development, Chris McClaughlin, on a toasty Summer day recently. He was kind enough to meet me in the downstairs lobby  – a modern but elegant entry convenient to one of the major stops for the Chicago Transit Authority (map here).  

Up we went to their expansive and deceptively large common area. Sleek, clean furniture juxtaposed the industrial feel of the exposed brick walls and weathered hardwood floors. This was just the beginning of an exceptional space and community.

To the left, Chris escorted me to their rooftop ‘backyard’ area complete with grass (actually astro turf), outdoor projector for movies, lounge chairs and hot tub. Sweet views of Chicago were the bonus. The space felt way more private than you would imagine. Despite giant glass and steel over shadowing the old building on multiple sides, one has a sense of serenity. Not a bad start to a tour.  

After talking about some of the history of the buildings and infamous Chicago characters, we cut through the inside common area out onto another patio on the West side. This was a super-call outdoor bar and grilling area which felt more like a bistro than therapeutic program. Chris pointed out the buildings where Al Capone had secret get-a-ways, we talked about the history of the city and then, after the late-morning sun started to cook us, we got around to talking about the program. It’s center around what they refer to as Core Competencies: Whole Brain Thinking (Rational & Irrational Thinking); Creativity and Continuous Learning; Effective Communication; Leading within Teams; Community Stewardship; Sustaining Healthy Relationships; Self Care; and Management of Resources and Technology. Rather than cutting and pasting from their site, I recommend going to their site to read through the details.

After lunch in the kitchen/dining room, we toured the rooms that, to be honest, felt way more like high-end apartments with large kitchens. High ceilings and plenty of space for single or multiple students make each room a great space for studying, hanging-out and even cooking. Chris and I spoke about the limitations of many programs that only accept young adults in recovery. Edge is well-prepared and works often with folks struggling with addiction but they don’t think of themselves as a substance abuse program. It is not for those in the very early stages of recovery. It is definitely not for those that do not have basic internal locus of control and responsibility for their behaviors. The heavy lifting of support for each resident is performed by coaches who, for all intents and purposes are therapists as shared with me by their clinical director Jason Wynkoop. They are highly trained and competent to work with young adults struggling with organization, recovery, mental health issues and behavioral support needs.

Our tour and day ended high above Chicago talking about Edge, it’s program and the bright future they have since so many older, more established programs are just not meeting the current needs of students today. To summarize, here are some Pros and Cons to consider. If you need more insight, contact us. We’re happy to share what we know to help you make the best decision.

Pros

Aesthetics: Fantastic common areas (no crappy This-End-Up blocky wood sofas that smell like dog). Mature, hip and nicely appointed apartments with great views . As a side-note, I had no idea This-End-Up was still in business until I researched the link for this review. Wow.

Location: If you are freaked out by silence, if you can’t stand wilderness, and if you prefer the hyper-rhythmic flow of the city, Edge is where you need to be, especially if you are in college and need support.  It’s close to huge parks, museums, great restaurants, entertainment and tons of public transportation. Cars are definitely not needed here.

Independence: For those needing collaborative but not overbearing support from super competent professionals, Edge is your place. There is an expectation you are in school and keeping busy during the day.

Cons

Model: It’s not a bad thing but if you are looking for a super traditional transition program this may not be for you (or your son or daughter). Their collaborative approach rocks for some but may feel overwhelming to those that just want a bed for their head.

Location: If the cacophony of big city life wears you down, this is not the program for you. Edge’s DNA is inseparably tied to the fast-paced hustle of 2.715 million neighbors. Fit is a big deal when looking for support during the already stressful (and fun) time of college and young adulthood.

To be honest, there just aren’t many Cons – nothing here is inherently bad. Quality, in this case, is clearly defined by fit. For those ready for the interdependence of young adulthood we highly recommend visiting Edge for one of their informational meetings/weekends, talking to alum and getting a tour before committing to Edge. Once you know it’s the right place for you, you’ll experience the intense, positive support of this fantastic, innovative community.

 

Services: Concierge Service as Compliment to After-Care

In 2012, Fonthill took an unprecedented step beyond the traditional case management, beyond after-care and beyond educational consulting model to meet the complex needs of our client families around the country. After gathering feedback from professionals, clients and colleagues, Fonthill’s launched an exclusive Concierge Service as part of our Case Management package. Here is a list of our updated current offerings which is still a work in progress. We’d love your feedback on what you think is missing and what your experience has been with services like this.

Coordinating Safety/Security Measures: Scheduling and overseeing alarm installation, security company/consultation for home or travel

Obtaining Tickets: Concerts, special events and sporting events

Coordinating Transportation Services: Planning all aspects of travel to and from home, school or work

Travel and Vacation Planning: Planning all aspects of recreational travel and vacation planning

Restaurant Recommendations and Reservations: Providing specific recommendations and reservations

Pet Services: In-home pet care during school, work or anytime support is required

Personalized Shopping and Delivery: Extra set of hands or full pick up and delivery from grocery stores, local mall or delivery center like UPS or USPS

Dry Cleaning Pick-up and Delivery: One item or Ten, we’ll drop off and pick up at the dry cleaner of your choice or ours if requested

Modified House Sitting: Waiting for repair person to show? Waiting for a delivery? We’ll be there when you can not

Gift Pick Up or Return: Finding the perfect gift at the last minute or returning something to the store

Meal Delivery: Hate the idea of some random pizza delivery person? We’ll go and pick up any meal for you

Bill Paying: We will help set up or drop off payments for any bill

Auto Care: We will schedule the maintenance, drop it off and pick it up

Home Organization and Cleaning: No time for cleaning? We will coordinate with dependable cleaning service to keep your place beautiful

Prescription Pick Up: Discrete medication pick-up for both over the counter and prescription

Repair and Service Calls: Not sure who to call when something goes wrong? We’ll set up any home repairs

Sick Care: Any errands that you need while you are sick in bed

Personal Chef: Take-out got you down? No time or interest in cooking? We’ll bring in a personal chef for healthy, quality meals

Landscaping: We will set up landscape services and ensure regular service to keep your yard looking lovely, leaf removal in the Fall, snow/Ice removal in the Winter

Charter a Private Jet, Yachts or Helicopter: Want a special travel experience? We’ll charter a private jet, yacht or helicopter

Fashion and Stylist Consultant: When you need help finding your style we’ll call in the expert stylists for fashion, make-up and professional identity

Tee Time: We’ll set up tee time for you and friends at the local course and make sure everything is set for a great day on the links

Moving Assistance: We’ll pack/unpack your boxes and put it all away before you step foot in your new home

We’ve had fantastic response to these additional services which allow parents to feel confident their adult children stepping down from treatment into a transition program or independent apartment or dorm room is completed supported. From a clinical perspective, our concierge service started some interesting discussions among therapists and counselors about where the lines are and how we define ‘comprehensive care’ within the substance abuse, mental health and behavioral health world.