Pocket Points: Rewarding Students for Not Using their Phones

If you have not been in a college classroom recently, you might be surprised at just how glued to their phones students are. Phones are basically like slot machines in Vegas – students at constantly on their phone, afraid of missing out on a post, request or the next cool thing to do. When parents ask for a solution, I’m often at a loss of how they can encourage responsible phone use when kids are at school.

But some folks want to change that. Two college students looked around one day during a huge freshman year class in 2014 and noticed every face was lit by the glow of a phone. No one was paying attention. They decided to do something about it.

Pocket Points is an app that middle school, high school and college students can download onto their phone or iPad. Once students open the Pocket Points app and lock their phone, they start to accumulate points. The longer their phone stays locked, the more points they can get.
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Points are also awarded based on how many people are on the app at a time. The app is free and only works on a campus that’s identified by Pocket Points. Students can redeem their points for free or discounted items from local vendors.

To see if your son or daughter’s school is part of the program check out Pocket Points at https://pocketpoints.com/schools. It’s not a perfect setup and there are plenty of ways to game the system but let’s give thanks that it’s not another sticky social media app.

https://pocketpoints.com

Insider’s Guide: Educational Consulting and Therapeutic Placement

It was warm, breezy day in the little cove where the treatment center was located where my client and her parents were standing. We were all on the back deck of the main building and the parents and I had just arrived. The client smiled after a few minutes of small talk and said, “Um, not to be rude or anything, but who are you?” Her parents looked mortified and embarrassed that she didn’t know who I was.

“My name is Rob Danzman and we’ve met several times before you came to treatment. I helped your parents find a healthy place for you.”

The client, after pausing for a second smiled again and said “I think I was so high I don’t even remember you. Thank you.” She started crying. Her parents started crying and they hugged.

There is a deep and broad gap between what families need and all of the treatment options available. There are a ton of variables to consider when your son or daughter need treatment, whether its outpatient therapy or residential treatment. Insurance, location, modality, diagnosis, and housing options are just a few things families need to consider when figuring out what’s best.

There is a dramatic range in expertise and costs and they are not often aligned. Some of the most expensive consultants with whom I’ve worked have minimal understanding of psychological conditions and the evidence-based approaches that best treat them. The goal of treatment is either assessment, intervention or maintenance of a behavioral health issue. If a consultant does not have a combination of academic and experiential background they may not serve clients well. In fact, my agency has worked with clients who were given terrible advice on what types of service to use. You would never have a mechanic give advice on spinal surgery because, while the mechanic may be really well-intentioned and personable, they may due considerable harm. The same is true when dealing with behavioral issues, many of which either in the short or long term may have life and death implications.

Evidence-based interventions need to be well understood and require clinical expertise. Therapeutic placements do a great job of presenting themselves as comfortable, safe and a good value yet many do not provide evidence-based treatments. Evidence based treatments are not for broad spectrum of psychological issues.

Another confusing aspect is the terminology. Decades ago, educational consultants did a few things and did them well – they focused on private school and college prep admissions. They provided deep advice on testing strategy, applications, and how to write a great essay. They coached clients through interviewing and often the whole education process. But over the years, ECs expanded their service offerings, often outside of their area of expertise. ECs without credentials or appropriate degrees started advising parents on treatment recommendations, presumably assuming that applying to a treatment center is similar if not the same as applying to college. Since those wild-west days of ECs pushing kids into cookie-cutter programs and charging a fortune, more clinicians with actual therapeutic experience have entered the EC world. Granted, there is still the old guard of older, white women who had their own children placed in a treatment center and saw an opportunity to help other families while making good money in an unregulated field. There are essentially only one entity that oversee ECs – the Independent Educational Consultants Association. The division continues to widen between those serving families

EC should not receive gifts from treatment centers though it’s not unusual for them to have travel expenses covered when they are touring programs.

There is a symbiotic relationship between treatment centers and ECs. Treatment centers count on ECs for referrals. ECs count on treatment programs to cover travel expenses and, sometimes, provide referrals back to the ECs when a client needs a different placement or the family needs advice on treatment options.  

Where to Find These Magical Beings

First thing to do is just google the terms “educational consultant” and “treatment.” You should get plenty of options that pop up. You could also just contact my agency but I’m a bit biased since I believe we do great work for a fair price.

Next way to find a placement consultant is to go to the Independent Educational Consultants Association (IECA) website (below in the Resources section) and look for the ‘Search’ option under the Parents tab. All of the people listed in this resource are paying members of IECA and met the IECA’s criteria. If you are going this route, I encourage you to, at a minimum, look for a consultant who has a graduate degree in a behavioral health discipline like counseling, psychology or marriage and family. Pastoral counselors or ‘Qualified Mental Health Practioners’ are not nearly qualified enough. It’s even better if they are a licensed professional (eg. Licensed Professional Counselor, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Licensed Clinical Social Worker).

Do Your Homework

A great EC can support your family through the most difficult times while a bad EC can cost your valuable time and money and have nothing to show for it or set things back even further with a terrible placement.

Consult: If you can’t meet them face to face, then schedule a call with them. Before you go into any details, dig into the business end of their service first. Do they offer therapeutic placement consulting or do they focus on prep school and college? What are ALL the costs associated with what they do. What is their degree in and what active licenses do they hold. Ask if they are a member of any associations and if they have any disciplinary actions against them. Ask when and how they got into educational consulting. Ask what the scope of their work is – Do they meet clients at treatment centers for admissions? Do they continue to work with families while the client is in treatment? Do they assist with discharge planning?

Payment: Another thing to consider is how the ED gets paid. It’s important to understand whether the EC sends you an invoice and bills as they go along or do they receive a retainer upfront. Though not a deal breaker, I don’t like asking for retainers from clients for the same reason I don’t like attorneys collecting a retainer from me. They have my money and pull from it as they do work. I’d prefer to pay for things as we go along through a project. We only accept credit cards so that a) there is protection for the client and b) we don’t need to run after clients to pay an invoice. We also itemize every time we charge a client’s card so that everything is 100% transparent. Ask about how folks get paid before you agree to work with them. If they can’t agree to provide itemized billing or seem too focused on money upfront, you may want to consider working with someone else.

Guarantee: It’s unlikely anyone is going to offer you a guarantee for their services but it doesn’t mean you can’t ask about their responsibility if a treatment option doesn’t work or a treatment option can’t be found in a reasonable amount of time.

Cost

Take a deep breath for this section. Expect to pay between $10,000 – $300. Yes, I know that’s a ridiculously large range but there are no regulations on what an EC can charge. The spectrum of fees is truly that big. Some charge as much as $10,000 for a placement. They may put in 5-10 hrs but their rate doesn’t change. Other ECs charge a lower rate but most have a basic flat fee which covers support and advice through the admissions process. In my humble opinion, a lower flat fee or hourly rate is more fare. For instance, my agency has a free consultation to determine if someone really needs an EC. If we determine the client really can’t find an appropriate treatment option on their own, we charge $179 per hour and use as few hours as possible. We’ve had client come to us after spending $25,000 on placement services only to realize the ECs they were using had no clue about severe clinical issues like substance abuse and schizophrenia. Fortunately, we quickly found them services and billed them less than $500.

FAQ

Q: I know how to do internet researching. Why can’t I just find a treatment program on my own?

A: You could totally do this own your own. There are three easy steps. First – get a graduate degree in some counseling or psychological discipline to learn the clinical aspects of behavioral health and intervention. Next – work in the behavioral health industry for about five years so you can see what makes a program great and what makes a program terrible. Finally – go and visit 50 treatment programs. Granted, that will take a few years, and by the time you’re finished visiting, staff at each program will likely have changed (so start over). Ultimately, this experience  will be very helpful in determining which programs are good and which ones you would not trust to take care of your house plants. After all these steps, you should totally do some internet searching to decide which program is most effective at serving your loved one.

Resources

Independent Educational Consultants Association – https://www.iecaonline.com/

Spring Semester Planning for Kids Returning to College

You made it! The kids made it home, the in-laws were tolerable and there weren’t a ton of gifts that needed returning. Now that everyone is headed back to campus, it’s time to either let that old anxiety creep in or spend some time on the front end helping your son or daughter develop a plan to be successful for Spring Semester.

Money

If you have not learned by now, discuss how much you are giving to your kid and when you’ll give it to them. You don’t want to find yourself in a defensive position Sunday night while your son is blowing up your phone begging for their regular spending money to be put into their account early. I recommend putting money into the account 2x/month. Put it on them to create a budget which factors in their books, fun money and any other expenses. I also recommend a limit is set for any credit cards and deciding who and when it will be paid off.

Organization

Talk about starting the semester off with everything in it’s place – clothing, car, computer. Let’s make sure everything is reviewed, updated and ready to go. While we’re at it, let’s pull up the calendar and start looking into the future to see when things will need to be re-updated. Get the oil change scheduled, even if it’s two months out. Get the printer cartridge in your Amazon Wish List so that you can move it to the cart quickly when your printer gives you a frowny face.

Scheduling

Speaking of calendars, let’s go ahead and talk scheduling more in-depth. I recommend to every college student they use the following strategy: Get all your syllabi, Put all dates for tests, papers, office hours, etc on your calendar. For tests, count back from the test date one week and put schedule study times (no longer than 90 min). Do the same for papers. Break down writing the paper into reasonable and realistic chunks of time and put them on your calendar. Theme: Put everything on your calendar, everything. If your son or daughter are in greek life, there are a ton of events that can be put on the calendar. Same with internships or study abroad – break down all the details so that you can see things from 10,000 ft.

Travel/Visiting Home

Plan out whatever travel including home visits your kid will have mor might have. If travel plans are only possible and not 100%, put a question mark after it so at least everyone knows that period of time is possibly accounted for.

GPA 

If your kid’s GPA got beatin up a bit in the Fall, it’s probably a good idea to identify a reasonable expectation for the Spring. If your son or daughter limped home with C’s and D’s, ask what is a realistic GPA for which to aim. Talk about it but make it clear there needs to be something concrete. . Along with identifying a GPA to aim for, talk about specific strategies that will be used to support them. All colleges have student support and academic support options. For instance, here in Bloomington, Indiana University has a solid Academic Support Center with a ton of resources that work well for thousands of students struggling academically.

Graduation/End of Semester

Part of that schedule should also have details that show your finals and last day of classes. Put details about studying for finals, having family in town, etc. If your son or daughter is graduating, figure out details early in the semester since 1) things get crazy busy/expensive during graduation and 2) hotel rooms get sold-out.

On Campus Help

Besides hooking up with academic support, it’s not a bad idea to find a counselor/life coach that can act as liaison between home and school. This professional should provide regular updates to parents, meet and be available as often as needed. They should be well-versed in young adult issues like anxiety, depression and ADHD. Universities often have counseling centers on campus that provide individual counseling for about six sessions and then they refer to a community professional. They might have ideas about professionals near your kid’s school that can offer support.

Final bit of advice – trust your kids and trust the process. With a bit of planning, your kid’s semester will have highs and lows but ultimately, they’ll finish the semester better than they started it.

Trump Presidency: What this Means for Your Mental Health Care

 

I’m going to touch upon a few things with some educated guessing since at this point we have no information on any strategy for changing the healthcare system, including the Affordable Healthcare Act (aka. Obamacare).

Medications

Big Pharma may be big winners in this election. There is a good chance regulation will decrease which means drugs will be pushed through the regulatory process. There is also a very good chance your medications will get more expensive Obamacare will be directly targeted for dismantling. At this point, the federal government has some impact on what drug makers charge (at least for Medicare, Tricare and Medicaid clients). There is a very real fear that whenever there is a conflict between industry and clients/customers, the Trump administration may very well choose big business.

Affordable Health Care Act – Obamacare

This was one of Trump’s big targets and will likely be a focal point as the Trump administration sharpens its agenda in 2017. One big problem with Trump’s over simplistic promise to ‘get rid of Obamacare’ is that it took years and years to recalibrate and organize healthcare at the federal, state and corporate levels. Billions of dollars went into this law. Changing the law will take years and years and more billions. Insurance rates have gone up for many people and that hurts. But, the dismantling of Obamacare will likely have a dramatic and catastrophic effect on providers, clients and hospitals. The prediction at this point is that while the current system is experiencing growing pains, the replacement will likely compromise the little leverage we have over insurance companies meaning they will go back to charging whatever they want and having pre existing conditions the hallmark of how they keep people from needed care.

Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA)

The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) is a federal law that generally prevents group health plans and health insurance issuers that provide mental health or substance use disorder benefits from imposing less favorable benefit limitations on those benefits than on medical benefits. With the Trump administration taking the reigns in a few months, there is the possibility the act could be dismantled in favor of insurance companies, most of which have fought, lied and deceived policyholders from the very beginning of the law in 2009. What this means for you: Insurers may no longer be required to pay for comparable level of mental health and substance abuse treatment as you have within your medical policy.

I will continue to monitor Trump policy changes and post again soon. Till then, take a deep breath, stock up on canned goods and sweep out your bomb shelter. We’re likely in for a wild ride.

Rewards, Consequences, Punishment…What’s the Best Way to Parent Teens and College Kids?

A simpler what to think of this post is “How to Change Behavior.” That’s really the primary function of a reward or consequence.

There are more books on how to change kids’ behavior than just about any other topic. Ironically (or sadly), they all say the same thing. Punishment does not work; rewards work consequences for choices work. How can this be? Let’s kick the tires on the history and research behind this. If you hate history and research, jump ahead a few pages to the ‘how-to’ portion.

Context: Let’s Look Back First

For thousands of years before the Industrial Revolution, children were assets in an agrarian system (most humans up to that point farmed). We had lots and lots of kids since a) children were relatively cheap labor, b) most died during childbirth or as children and c) adult children became financial support systems for parents – the more children parents had, the more financial support and broader financial base.

In 1916, Congress passed the the first federal child labor law. However, pressure from big companies forced the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the law two years later. Following the Great Depression adults had become so desperate for jobs that they would work for the same wage as children.

In 1938, President Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act, which limited most forms of child labor (but excluded agricultural work). This was the beginning of our modern view of children needing protection, love and nurturing. A pendulum was set in motion.

In 1946, another revolution took place. Dr. Benjamin Spock published his first book titled Dr. Spock’s Baby & Child Care (also titled The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care). Though a medical doctor by education and training, Dr. Spock’s books put children at the center of parenting rather than the adults. He encouraged responding to and engaging with babies and children rather than ignoring which was the advice up to then. The pendulum’s momentum builds.

Finally, we add in money and work. In the early 80’s, adults were working more, making more money and, as a result, needing to leave their children at home (the so-called ‘latch-key’ kids). Children would get dropped off from the bus and walk into an empty home. Cartoons and snacks were gorged upon till mom and dad came home. Guilt stricken parents with extra cash (…or more accurately extra room on their new credit cards) went and bought Ataris, Nintendos and the new wave of electronics and toys for kids. We were now descending into entitlement. About this time, school districts were changing punishment in schools (no more spankings).

How can old-school grandma and grandpa who raised 15 kids have been so wrong? All the kids turned out great, right? Well, let’s break this down a bit. First of all, it was a different time. No devices, internet and certainly little to no advertising directed towards children. All marketing was targeting stay at home mothers.

I also want to point out that most of these old school versions of parenting created some pretty nasty problems which is why the fastest growing demographics for substance abuse treatment are the Baby Boomers and the elderly. Old school punishment, drinking habits, and expectations led to a generation that was not well-equipped to handle stressors.

Now for the Goods

Here are the best ways to change behavior and encourage healthy choices. I’ve taught these, studied these and continue to stand by these effective strategies:

Commit to the Path

  1. Drawn into accidentally energizing and rewarding negativity leads to a battle – Be intentional about being positive
  2. Intentionally energize and nurture success
  3. Provide a true and deep consequence when a rule is broken – something that is proportional to the infraction
  4. Reward for what you want to see.
  5. Ignore behaviors you want see less of.

Establish Expectations and Boundaries

  1. Detailed rules/expectations and no grey area – kids are MASTER negotiators and litigators
  2. Chores and Expectations – daily schedule or list
  3. Bonus behaviors – Things you wish to increase
  4. Menu of privileges – Can include anything beyond basic needs
  5. Extend Structure – At school, friends house, soccer practice, etc.

Consequences

  1. Relentless pursuit of positives: Biased towards seeing your kid’s great choices.
  2. Strictness and Clarity: Be like a videogame – if a rule is broken, a consequence is administered no matter how you are feeling.
  3. No Leaking: Accidentally rewarding behavior with negative energy but they contribute to your kid behaving badly.
  4. Finite: Consequences do not expand and are tied to a specific behavior/event.

Rewards

  1. Catch them doing things right: When I run parent groups I ask parents to list the amount of things they caught their kids doing wrong in the last month. Easy list to make. Then I ask them to list three things they caught them doing right. Much harder. We are programmed to find faults in this attempt to modify kids behaviors towards compliance – making bad choices is the loud, obvious indication they are out of line. We we fail to see are the million little choices they make each day which are well-thought out and positive. Focus on those. Highlight those. “Hey Julian, I noticed you put the dishes away without anyone asking you to do it. Great job.” …And then move on. No need to get mushy and turn it into an Oprah interview about thoughts and feelings.
  2. Types of rewards: Your eye contact and facial expression are huge rewards for younger kids. Rather than giving kids an iPhone or XBox, I encourage parents to give time on each device or toy as a reward. Have you ever kept the car you rented at the airport? No, you paid them to borrow it for a specific amount of time and then returned it. There are few instances where I encourage parents to buy something to give to their kids as a reward. Time, praise, and access to cool things is often way better for everyone.
  3. Negotiating: If you find yourself constantly reminder, encouraging, begging, etc. for you kids to do A so they get access to B, you are violating your own rules. You are now negotiating.
  4. List of Rewards: In 2007, one parent I was working with could not understand why their teenage son was not motivated by the reward of time on their Blackberry (same year iPhone introduced). If they are not doing chores, getting good grades or engaging in the behavior you want to see, your rewards may be incongruent with their desires. Ask them to tell you what they’re into. Maybe its an allowance, money for iTunes or they want to borrow the car.

And Lastly…Own Your Home

This is a hard one for parents (… and most kids) but until responsibility for the mortgage, bills and everything that makes a home function is shared among all family members – parents rule. There is no such thing as the ‘kid’s’ room. Everything, every room, every toy, every piece of clothing is the parents’. Great parents allow their kids to use those things. Remember…privilges are not rights and kids get to own their choices, not their TV.

Good Luck.

Insider’s Guide: Psychological Testing and Evaluations

Right after we moved to Indiana, something under the hood of our car started rattling loudly when it was first started-up each morning. I was sure the engine was failing and we’d either need a new car or, at minimum, a new engine. Fearing the worst, I took it to the dealership and tried my best to describe the noise. They took the car, hooked it up to their computer and ran diagnostics. Based on their findings, they adjusted some engine controls and replaced a sensor. Total cost was under $150 and about an hour of time. I was lucky it wasn’t more expensive. The technician said that if I had driven muh further, the engine would likely have overheated, blah, blah blah ….basically, bad things would have happened if I had not run the diagnositics. Money well spent.

My experience with our car reminded me of psychological evaluations and how often I talk with parents that want to wait a bit longer, save a bit more money or hold off until ‘things calm down’ before getting some diagnostics run. A shot engine would cost a few thousand dollars. Untreated behavioral health issues can cost tens of thousands of dollars and leave perminant scars. 

But when are things bad enough that you need to get a psychological evaluation? When is a car sounding bad enough to get diagnostics run? My definitive answer is this: When the symptoms are impacting a life domain (eg. school/work, relationships, family, activities) …and yes, this holds for both cars and people I believe. If things are bad enough to keep you up at night, it’s probably a good time to get evaluated.

The Basics

A psychological evaluation is a generic term used to describe a clinician’s use of tests, assessments and clinical interviews to determine a diagnostic presentation. Or, more simply put, what do all their symptoms add up to. There is no single test that makes up a psychological evaluation. A psychologist (often the most qualified type of behavioral health professional to administer testing), based on basic initial information about the client, chooses from a menu of tests and assessments all of which are evidence-based tests and procedures of assessing specific aspects of a person’s psychological profile. Some tests are used to determine IQ, some are to determine processing speed, others are used for personality, and still others for something else like depression or delusions.

Testing can be used to identify and sometimes determine the severity of just about any behavioral health disorder. Psychological testing is not definitive. While it can provide significant insight and give us a solid understanding of why someone is experiencing the symptoms they are, it can never provide certainty or causation. Clients can be found to ‘meet criteria for depression’ though, technically, we can never say without doubt they have depression. Sounds crazy but that’s how science and scientific testing works.

Here are the steps you should expect for the evaluation:

  1. Initial Intake: Initial intake appointment gathering basic background, symptoms and goals (1 hr)
  2. Testing: Psychological testing (1-6hrs)
  3. Write-Up: Psychologist writes-up the results (2 weeks)
  4. Results Session: Review of results and recommendations for treatment

Initial Intake and Testing

Let’s drill down into the details of testing. Once the tests are chosen, the evaluation is typically done in a formal manner by a licensed psychologist or therapist in their office. Depending upon what kind of testing is being done, it can last anywhere from 1 hour to a full day and consists largely of computer and paper-and-pencil tests.

There are generally four categories of tests:

  • Clinical Interview. The clinical interview is a core component of any psychological testing. Some people know the clinical interview as an “intake interview”, “admission interview” or “diagnostic interview” (although technically these are often very different things). Clinical interviews typically last from 1 to 2 hours in length, and occur most often in a clinician’s office. Many types of mental health professionals can conduct a clinical interview — psychologists, psychiatrists, licensed counselors, clinical social workers, and psychiatric nurses.
  • IQ. The most commonly administered IQ test is called the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). It generally takes anywhere from an hour to an hour and a half to administer, and is appropriate for any individual aged 16 or older to take. (Children can be administered an IQ test especially designed for them called the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fourth Edition, or the WISC-IV).
  • Personality Assessment. Personality assessment is designed to help a professional better understand an individual’s personality. Personality is a complex combination of factors that has been developed over a person’s entire childhood and young adulthood. There are multiple variables that influence our personality such as genetic, environmental and social components. Personality tests take this into account. There are two primary types of personality tests 1) objective, by far the most commonly used today, and 2) projective. Objective tests include things like the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2), the 16PF, and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III). Projective tests include the Rorschach Inkblot Test, the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), and the Draw-a-Person test.
  • Behavioral Assessment. Behavioral assessment is the process of observing or measuring a person’s actual behavior to try and better understand the behavior and the thoughts behind it, and determine possible reinforcing components or triggers for the behavior. Through the process of behavioral assessment, a person — and/or a professional — can track behaviors and help change them.

In addition to these primary types, other kinds of psychological tests are available for specific areas, such as aptitude or achievement in school, career counseling, management skills, and career planning. For instance, in our Kentucky office, we provide neuropsychological testing for head trauma, sports injuries, pre-employment and a bunch of other neuropsychologically-related areas. 

Results Session – What Next?

At the results session, you will meet with the psychologist and go over the results. You should get a copy of the full psychological evaluation (typically 5-20 pages). It should be broken down into the following format (or something very similar):

  1. Basic Demographic Information
  2. Reason for Referral
  3. Names of Tests Administered
  4. Data from Each Test
  5. Results (Diagnoses)
  6. Recommendations
  7. Signature and Title of Psychologist

A good psychologist will go through the entire document, explain the tests used and results fully. He or she will also review all the recommendations which will likely include one or more treatments like outpatient therapy, medication evaluation with a psychiatrist or placement in residential treament. The most important sections are the Results and Recommendations. The Results are the psychologist’s list of diagnoses that were supported from testing and observation. The Recommendations is the ‘what now’ piece where you understand your options for treatment based on the results. If you don’t understand something, ask. They should completely answer any questions you have.

A great psychologist will either offer a list of specific providers who offer the type of intervention or care recommended or refer you to a therapeutic placement consultant or educational consultant who can help with treatment placement.

Cost

If you are paying out of pocket, expect to pay $500-$2500 for the entire evaluation service. If you have insurance, contact the insurance company before scheduling an evaluation and ask what their coverage is for outpatient therapy and what your copay will be.

FAQ

Q: What if I disagree with the results or think the psychologist did a bad job?

A: During the final session when results are discussed, present your concerns and be a specific and factual as possible. Psychologists can only test based on information they have. If the psychologist had all the information but ignored important pieces, discuss this and, if necessary, make sure they do retesting to capture what they missed.

Q: Our daughter needs testing for an IEP at school. Is there a difference between psychological testing and testing at her school?

A: The testing you need is referred to as psychoeducation testing and often includes IQ testing. Testing for an IEP within a school system is not supposed to be used for diagnoses, only determining elegibility for an IEP or 504.

Q: How do we find a psychologist to do an evaluation?

A: If you are working with a therapist, start by asking if they have any recommendations of someone they trust and have worked with. If you are flying solo and have no one in your corner yet, check out Psychology Today (https://therapists.psychologytoday.com) > Type your Zip code into the search box > Under the Treatment Orientation on the left side, choose Psychological Testing and Evaluation. You should get a list of providers that conduct evaluations.  

Opioid Epidemic: John Oliver Sums it Up Best on HBO

Don’t Think Pain Meds and Heroin is Really a Big Deal? Check Out What the Surgeon General Just Did…

Surgeon General Writes to Every Doctor in U.S. About Opioid Epidemic

Opioid abuse is not like other problems. With very little use, pain meds and heroin can quickly become an addiction. This addiction has unusual drug dealers. Some are intentional (Big Pharma like Purdue Pharma, Cephalon, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Endo Health Solutions and Actavis) that exploit our pain and desperation. Other’s are likely well-meaning like primary care doctors most of whom are manipulated by the pharmaceutical companies to write prescriptions.

If you or a loved one is prescribed pain meds, take this seriously. Use as little as possible and work closely with your doctor. If you can’t stop, get help immediately. The longer someone abuses opioids, the harder it is to get back on track.

Insider’s Guide: Top 5 Things for Your College Student Transitioning to Fall Semester

Most of the students with whom I work have depression, anxiety and mild substance abuse. One of the easiest, cheapest and most effective tools for combating these struggles in college is detailed planning. Below, I’ve outlined the Top 5 things I tell every student to implement as they are showing up for Fall semester.

  1. Syllabi Dates. Encourage your college student to plug-in all dates into their calendar from the syllabi they receive over the coming days. Once all the test dates are put in, reverse engineer two weeks prior to the test dates and put study dates into the calendar for no longer than 90 minute chunks. If it’s not scheduled, it will get pushed off till the last minute.
  2. Professor Office Hours. Everyone will want to meet with professors the Thursday and Friday before Thanksgiving. Have your above-average college student pull their professor’s office hours from the syllabus (yes, all professors put office hours on there) and plug into the calendar.
  3. Download Your University’s Academic Calendar. In June, I downloaded the Indiana University’s academic calendar for Fall 2016. It is a small file from Indiana University’s Academic page for any student or parent to view or download. Once downloaded, your college student can upload it into their calendar. Now, they’ll know Add/Drop dates, Fall Break, Winter Break, Finals, etc.
  4. Don’t Talk Every Day. Plan to talk 2x/week – (eg. Wednesdays and Saturdays). It’s time to intentionally create more autonomy, build trust, and not feel like you need to hover over them.
  5. Set up Counseling Early. Counselors and mental health providers get slammed since there are so few of us in most college towns. There are even fewer psychiatrists for medication management. Start looking for a counselor/therapist now before the semester gets in full swing. Psychiatrists are often scheduled out 2-3 months.

Good luck and please reach out for more suggestions and strategies to mitigate the challenges your college student is facing with depress, anxiety or substance abuse. Don’t go it alone.

Missouri: Only State Not on Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

It was a mystery for the last few years – why were so many people going to Missouri to get their prescriptions (…mostly opioids like Vicodin/Lortab or Oxycodone)? Mystery solved. As of 2012, Missouri was the only state in the United States that did not participate in a national registry for prescription drugs.

Just in case you forgot where Missouri is

Just in case you forgot where Missouri is

Let’s dive a bit deeper…

What’s The prescription drug monitoring program?

Better known as PDMP, it’s an online database that collects data on controlled substance prescriptions dispensed within each participating state. It can act as an early warning system for prescribers to avoid dangerous drug interactions and to ensure quality patient care. 

PDMP is also a tool that also can be used to intervene in the early stages of prescription drug abuse, as well as to assist providers in preventing prescription drug abuse and enable providers of pain medications to know if they are treating someone who has been “doctor shopping”  (going from doctor to doctor for multiple prescriptions).

PDMP does not impact the legal prescribing of drugs by a provider – it simply makes it possible to spot a potential problems or trends.

Why Missouri Doesn’t want PDMP?

Well, Missouri kind-of does want PDMP. In 2012 the state came oh so close to enacting PDMP. But while proponents say most Missouri citizens and legislators support participation in PDMP, it has been blocked by lawmakers like State Senator Rob Schaaf, a family doctor who argues (…inaccurately in my humble opinion) that allowing the government to keep prescription records violates a patient’s personal privacy. He’s probably referring to HIPAA and/or HITECH which are privacy laws that protect a patient’s health records. After successfully combating the 2012 version of the Missouri legislative bill, Dr. Schaaf said of drug abusers, “If they overdose and kill themselves, it just removes them from the gene pool.” Dr. Schaaf is seemingly more focused on individuals liberty (…for prescription drugs) than on life. Fortunately, he appears to be in the minority within Missouri.

How to access the PDMP information

It’s not so easy. You’ve got to be a doctor, part of the legal system or law enforcement to get access. The PDMP data is stored by specified statewide regulatory, administrative or law enforcement agency as designated by state law. The agency distributes data from the database to individuals who are authorized under state law to receive the information. Information is shared across state lines when needed.